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Royal Enfield Takes Down the Himalayan Video from YouTube, Readies a Replacement

Remember the rather amusing story with the peg that breaks off during an official Royal Enfield Himalayan promo video? That story circled the planet multiple times and generated all sorts of reactions, until RE decided to have the official video removed from YouTube.
Royal Enfield Himalayan 1 photo
We'll leave judging how futile such a move is to you, anyway. Trying to hide that unfortunate mistake under the carpet may work in other cases and with other communication channels, but when it comes to YouTube and online media, such an attempt is doomed to fail.

It doesn't take an internet or social media expert to figure out that hundreds of screenshots have been already taken from that video, and are present in the photo galleries associated with the news already published.

Likewise, saving a video from YouTube is one of the things many journalists and bike fans often do, especially when it comes to funny stories like that of the broken Himalayan. Still, we can understand that Royal Enfield needs some damage control, and we’re okay with this.The old video is no longer suitable for the public
We're glad to see that RE finally understood that an OEM simply can't release such a promotional video, and it is making efforts to improve the situation.

Royal Enfield faced massive criticism after releasing the video, and the company's CEO Siddhartha Lal chose to provide some clarifications via Twitter, but in an equally inappropriate way.

Mr. Lal tweeted: "bikers- many parts break while validating a motorcycle for lakhs km. we liked the shot, we kept it!" but the riding community would not buy such explanations.

Recently, a Royal Enfield official stated that the company removed the video and a new, better one is on its way. To make things funny (albeit involuntarily), they just had to add that the making of the new promo video has nothing to do with the peg breaking off.

Yeah, right, the hue of the video was the problem, and recoloration would not have done. Honestly, we could not care less about how promos are being made, but we think it's way more important that Royal Enfield produces an adventure bike that would not make a 3-foot jump such an adventure. If you know what we mean...

 
 
 
 
 

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