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Rouser Camper Trailer Is Built on the Idea That an RV Just Needs To Be Cheap and Work
Mobile living seems to be one of the hottest industries in recent years. For what reason? I don't know. But, what I do know is that you don't need a whole bunch of cash just to own a trailer that offers you a place to rest your head at night and be able to carry some cargo.

Rouser Camper Trailer Is Built on the Idea That an RV Just Needs To Be Cheap and Work

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This seems to be the case with the Rouser, an RV built by the team members at Runaway Campers. If you've never heard of this crew, it should help to know a couple of things; the first is that they're founded right here in our own backyard, Florida. Secondly, they seem to have made it their mission to offer potential buyers affordable and simple campers. For example, the Rouse is the second most expensive habitat from this manufacturer and rolls in with a price tag of $8,620 (€7,962 at current exchange rates).

Ok, so Rouser is cheap, but what else? Well, one thing we can conclude from the images in the gallery and the video below is that this camper is relatively large. But, as big as it is, it's built from materials like fiberglass and aluminum, making it rather light. Sitting on a steel chassis, this sucker only weighs a mere 840 lbs (381 kg). Best of all, the presence of a 3,500 lb (1,587 kg) Dexter axle also means you can bring along quite the gear.

However, there's a catch; it's cheap, it's big, but it is rather bare. This simply means that all you're really given is a big fiberglass box with which to create a functioning mobile habitat. If you like DIY projects or really want to make an RV reflect your inner spirit, the Rouser can be a great alternative to work with. The exterior shell is, as I mentioned, completed from fiberglass, includes some aluminum trim, and includes diamond plate fenders. Throw on a couple of windows, and your RV is ready, well, almost.

Now, entry is completed via a hatch on the starboard side of the camper, and what Runaway Campers points out is that this trailer is their only model in which you don't need to crawl to access the interior. But with an interior height of 5.83 ft (1.78 m), you'll still hunch over if you're taller than that. Once you've made your way into the trailer, don't plan on finding much except some power sockets and a frame for a double or possibly a queen-size mattress.

But all isn't lost. To the right of the entrance, there seems to be enough space to include a rather equipped galley setup. There's enough room to install a countertop and cabinets, integrate a fridge and stovetop into it, and even add a couple of water tanks and a faucet. Go on, get your hands dirty. With a storage shell installed as standard, you should be more than fine.

With the room you have left, you can load up the Rouser with all your campground essentials before you take it to the road. You can fit a couple of chairs, a table, and even gear for activities like hiking and trekking. If you can figure out a way to add a bike rack to the drawbar, you should be able to get even more fun out of this machine. Want a tad more fun? Runaway offers plenty of extras to add to your trailer, and a roof rack is on that list. So is a road shower, awnings, roof baskets, and some shell protection options.

Honestly, to heck with RVs that seem to be more a mobile home than a camper. With something like the Rouser, you have plenty of room to personalize your habitat to your liking, transforming it into a true expression of who you are and how you like to adventure.



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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