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Rolls-Royce’s Phantom Serenity Showed Us what Bespoke Truly Means in Geneva

Rolls-Royce released a press release a couple of days before the Geneva Motor Show kicked off telling us that they were preparing a special model but we didn’t expect this. Blame it on the plethora of ‘special’ or ‘unique’ models the Brits have been putting out lately or on anything else but the truth of the matter is, the Serenity Phantom is truly special.
Rolls-Royce Phantom Serenity at Geneva 22 photos
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Bespoke is what Rolls-Royce calls its cars and looking at this thing we got the feeling that the word is used way too freely by every car maker out there. Inside this particular model you’ll be greeted by Chinese silk, rare smoked cherrywood, mother of pearl, bamboo and arctic white leather. Can it get better than this?

The car was created to honor the elite of Rolls-Royce interior dating back to the early 20th century, celebrating silk as an important factor in defining royalty and imperial power.

In creating the Serenity Phantom, the Goodwood-based company was inspired by contemporary interpretation of European furniture combined with Japanese Royal Kimonos. As you can see, the result has a floral motif on the door panels, upholstery, roof lining and even body panels.

Every piece of silk is hand-woven in China and every flower used in the car’s design was hand-painted. The mother of pearl paint used on this particular Rolls is actually the most expensive one ever to be developed by the company and applying it is done in three stages. To top it off, craftsmen have to hand polish the whole car during a process that takes 12 hours.

The car was actually put together with the help of two young, female, textile design prodigies, Cherica Haye and Michelle Lusby, under the supervision of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars’ own Director of Design, Giles Taylor.

“Cherica and Michelle bring with them a deep understanding of different textures and applications in design; when combined with the existing expertise of the Bespoke team we can reach new boundaries in automotive design, allowing us to incorporate precious, beautiful and natural materials in our motor cars,” Giles Taylor commented on the Geneva show floor.

Well, we have absolutely no objections here as this thing looks absolutely incredible. We didn’t even ask for a price tag as it would definitely be irrelevant...

 
 
 
 
 

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