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Revamped 1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV Holds Ample Doses of Vintage Two-Stroke Grace

With its unrelenting two-stroke force, the H2 Mach IV made its competition tremble back in the day.
1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV 26 photos
1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV1974 Kawasaki H2 Mach IV
Commonly referred to as “The Widowmaker,” Kawasaki’s iconic H2 Mach IV is what many gearheads think about when picturing the quintessential Japanese two-stroke from the seventies. In the following paragraphs, we’ll be introducing you to a reconditioned 1974 model that looks as if it left the factory a few months ago.

Before it was purchased by the current owner, the classic warrior saw its tail, fuel tank, and side panels repainted in a dark green base, which is joined by lime accents and white pinstripes. Furthermore, the Mach IV’s two-up saddle was reupholstered during the overhaul, while the fuel tank has been internally lined for good measure.

The transmission and front brake fluids were recently flushed, and power is sent to the rear wheel via a modern drive chain. Kawi’s legend spent more than four decades locked away in storage prior to the 2019 refurbishment, but its total mileage is, sadly, a complete mystery.

Featuring an air-cooled 748cc inline-three engine with throttle-controlled oil injection and 30 mm (1.2 inches) Mikuni carbs, the ‘74 MY H2 Mach IV is good for up to 74 hp and 57 pound-feet (77 Nm) of torque at the crankshaft. To reach the bike’s rear wheel, this force travels through a five-speed gearbox and a wet multi-plate clutch.

Aided by a dry weight of 452 pounds (205 kg), the Japanese titan is able to reach a top speed of 120 mph (193 kph). Suspension duties are managed by telescopic forks and twin preload-adjustable shock absorbers, while stopping power originates from a single brake disc up front and a traditional drum at the rear.

The vintage head-turner presented above is making its way to the auction block at this very moment, and the bidding deadline is set for tomorrow afternoon (May 23). For the time being, securing this purchase would set you back about fourteen grand because the highest bid is currently placed at $13,500.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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