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Revamped 1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R Is One Sexy Piece of Numbers-Matching History

The design language of antique Bonnevilles is the very definition of timeless, so it’s no wonder that newer models look strikingly similar to their old-school counterparts.
1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R 23 photos
1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R
Back in the seventies, Triumph’s lineup was lagging behind its Japanese competition in just about every way, but that didn’t stop creatures like this numbers-matching 1970 MY Bonneville T120R from gaining a cult classic aura as the years went by. Despite their inherent drawbacks, most gearheads will happily spend some serious dough on a well-kept vintage Bonnie, and we honestly can’t blame them.

The ownership of one such entity doesn’t just give you something extremely gorgeous to look at when you walk into your garage, but it also provides you with a bike whose value is pretty much guaranteed to appreciate over time. A few years ago, the T120R pictured above saw its bodywork enveloped in a fresh coat of paint, while the exhaust system was fitted with brand-new mufflers.

Furthermore, the Bonneville’s steering head bearings, fork internals, and fuel lines have all been replaced following the current owner’s acquisition. Within its framework, the English stunner packs an air-cooled 649cc parallel-twin mill that’s connected to a four-speed transmission. The engine’s maximum power output figures are rated at 50 ponies and 39 pound-feet (52 Nm) of twisting force.

Upon reaching the rear 18-inch hoop, these digits will eventually translate into a top speed of 109 mph (176 kph). Stopping power is generated by a twin leading-shoe drum brake at the front and a single leading-shoe unit at the opposite end. Finally, Triumph’s legend weighs a very modest 423 pounds (192 kg) on an empty stomach, and it rests on telescopic forks up north and twin shocks down south.

The immaculate ‘70 MY Bonneville T120R we’ve just examined is heading to the auction block on the BaT (Bring a Trailer) platform at this very moment, so it could become a part of your collection if you act quickly! With just under 24 hours to go before the bidding deadline, one would need something in the neighborhood of nine grand to take the lead, as the current bid is registered at $8,900.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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