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Renault Expands Smart Electric Ecosystem Concept to French Island

In its push to provide a comprehensive set of services to go with its electric cars, Renault plans to unveil a brand new, smart, electric mobility system called FlexMob’île on the French island of Belle-Île-en-Mer.
Renault electric cars make a new home in Belle-Île-en-Mer 12 photos
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The system is centered around a car sharing program that uses only electric vehicles. These cars will take their electricity from solar panels installed on the roofs of the island’s main public buildings, while second-life batteries will be used to power the island's largest holiday residences facility.

Should the trial on the French island have the desired effects, Renault plans to expand its availability on other islands as well, and possibly to environments a little more difficult to manage like cities and suburban areas.

For a few years now, French manufacturer Renault, one of the few established carmakers to have a constant output of electric vehicles, has been trying to take electricity generated for and by its cars far beyond the road.

In February, Renault announced it has begun testing vehicle-to-grid (V2G) charging solutions, a system through which electric vehicles would either pull or return electricity to the grid, on the two islands of the Madeira archipelago in Portugal.

For the test, V2G was paired with a more comprehensive set of solutions for electric vehicles, including the use of second-life batteries to store electricity coming from solar and wind farms.

The use of second-life batteries for other purposes than the one they were originally created for is actively pursued by most carmakers currently selling EVs.

As for the V2G charging system, when fully deployed it may prove an even cheaper way to power an EV.

Charging a car through this system would allow customers to save money by using the electricity when supply exceeds demand, but also from acting as backups for the grid during peak hours.

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