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Rare and All-Original 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 With Three Miles Is Next to Immaculate

It’s the street-legal version of a bike created with WSBK domination in mind, though calling it collectible would be a bit of an understatement.
1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 46 photos
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The 1990 Honda RC30 – alternatively known as the VFR750R – was built in limited numbers for WorldSBK homologation purposes. Only 3,000 units have been produced by the Japanese marque to satisfy regulations, demanding north of $15k when new and many times that amount today.

What lies beneath the motorcycle’s bodywork is a liquid-cooled 748cc V4 with titanium connecting rods, gear-driven dual overhead cams, and 11:1 compression. This carbureted sixteen-valve powerhouse has the ability to summon up to 118 ponies when the crank turns at 11,000 rpm. Lower down the rev range, the engine is good for up to 51 pound-feet (70 Nm) of twisting force.

A six-speed gearbox feeds this power to the rear wheel, enabling Honda’s homologation special to ultimately reach a top speed of 153 mph (246 kph). The mill is enshrouded in a twin-spar skeleton made of aluminum, and front-end suspension duties are taken good care of thanks to adjustable 43 mm (1.7-inch) Showa forks.

On the opposite end, the RC30 is supported by a premium shock absorber and a single-sided swingarm. Braking comes from dual 310 mm (12.2-inch) floating discs and four-piston Nissin calipers up north, while the rear wheel is brought to a halt via a 220 mm (8.7-inch) rotor and a two-piston caliper.

Lastly, this Japanese rarity has a wheelbase of 1,410 mm (55.5 inches), and it’ll tip the scales at 488 pounds (221 kg) fully loaded. As we’ve now familiarized ourselves with the VFR750R’s spec sheet, let’s talk more specifically about the exemplar displayed in this article’s photo gallery.

Showing a mere three miles (about five kilometers) on the odo, the bone-stock gemstone is going under the hammer on Iconic Motorbike Auctions right now! Generous and substantial though it may be, the top bid of just under 70 grand still doesn’t meet the reserve, and there are currently three days separating us from the bidding deadline of November 25.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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