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Rare 1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast Looks Absolutely Perfect After a Full Restoration

Given the excellent condition it’s in, we'd say this vintage legend would be fit for a museum.
1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast 17 photos
1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast
Early-production Sandcast variants of Honda’s CB750 lineup aren't easy to come by because a mere 7,414 copies were assembled until September 1969. That number represents less than two percent of the first-gen CB750's total sales figure, so a Sandcast model in good condition can easily fetch double the price of its regular counterparts.

What differentiates them is the casting method used to sculpt the engine cases, with the earliest exemplars featuring gravity-cast parts and rougher surface textures. Otherwise, these creatures are basically identical to later iterations, and the one you’re seeing here was thoroughly reconditioned about two years ago.

The overhaul was performed by World Motorcycles of San Bruno, California, addressing everything from performance to aesthetics. For starters, this CB750 Four K0 saw its bodywork and duplex cradle frame repainted to keep things looking squeaky-clean. The wheels were revamped and subsequently fitted with a fresh set of tires from Dunlop’s inventory.

Additionally, an extensive makeover took place in the powertrain sector, and the same fate followed for the motorcycle’s telescopic forks. No further details concerning the restoration process are available, but those Nippon Denso gauges appear to have been refurbished, too. As such, the machine’s total mileage is unknown.

Powering the 1969 MY CB750 is an air-cooled 736cc four-banger that packs quad 28 mm (1.1-inch) Keihin carbs and eight valves actuated through a single overhead cam. By supplying up to 67 hp and 44 pound-feet (60 Nm) of crank-measured twisting force, the engine lets Honda’s artifact achieve a top speed of 124 mph (200 kph).

Currently located in SoCal, this classic Japanese rarity is looking for a new place to call home on Bring a Trailer. The highest bid amounts to a whopping $26,500 at the time of this article, and there are only two days separating us from the auctioning deadline, which is set for the early afternoon of Tuesday, July 26.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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