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Rainpal Looks like Another Interesting and Funny Visor Wiper Idea

Rain is clearly one of the top enemies of a rider, and Rainpal is a new visor wiper project that struggles to get rid of at least one of the shortcomings that come with riding in the wet. Visor wipers are nothing new, and we've seen a handful of ideas over the years. From an engineering standpoint, Rainpal is the sleekest and may stand a chance, but we doubt that the riding community will be too quick to adopt it.
Rainpal 11 photos
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Poor visibility is one of the drawbacks that riding in the rain comes with, and reduced tire grip and brake fading tag along, making wet rides an even less safe preoccupation. Rainpal promises to deal with the water on the visor, and, therefore, increase road safety thanks to superior vision.

Unlike other helmet wipers we saw, that were quite bulky, Rainpal boasts a low profile. The battery, controls and the mechanism that moves the actual wiper are located in a small structure that can be installed on the top edge of the visor.

Its makers claim that it can withstand speeds of up to 160 km/h (100 mph), which is, of course, more than enough for wet conditions. However, those who want to let loose a bit (and deal with legal consequences) once the roads are dry will be forced to stop first and remove it before opening the throttle fully.

Rainpal comes with adjustable wiper speed, delay, and a one-click-one-wipe function. Power comes from rechargeable batteries and can be powered on board using a bike's USB port or portable battery. Also, Rainpal can be used with pretty much any type of helmet, and even with Pinlock lenses.

The grip system and the road debris are two of the main concerns


Now, the spec sheet tells us that the Rainpal is guaranteed to stay on the open visor at speeds of up to 25 km/h (15 mph), which is not at all much. Again, what about those riders who like to ride with an open visor as soon as the rain stops (and we have such fellows here)?

Dirt on the roads that gets sprayed on the visor may be yet another matter that needs to be addressed better. Muck and other types of dirt can easily damage the surface of the visor, which is nowhere near as enduring as the glass windshield of a car that can withstand tens of thousands of wipes before scratching.

Optional wireless remote controls are also on the list, but the carrying case is standard. The creators of this project say that it would only take seconds to install it flawlessly, and if this is true, maybe it's not that much of a hassle removing it when no longer needed.

If you feel like £50 (€65 or $72) is a good investment, you can claim your Rainpal from Fundrazr.



 

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