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Porsche Carrera GT up for Sale with Just 342 Miles Could Be Yours

The last two decades have seen some of the world's greatest cars ever. Pagani, Lamborghini, Koenigsegg, and Mercedes AMG have all brought incredible cars to the market. We can't forget the holy trinity of the Porsche 918, McLaren P1, and the Ferrari LaFerrari either. Still, none may compare to the Porsche Carrera GT.
Porsche Carrera GT 7 photos
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So how much would a Carrera GT be worth in basically new condition? We're about to find out. Somewhere in Chicago, IL there sits a Silver Metalic 2005 Porsche Carerra GT with just 342 miles on the odometer.

That's an average of just 22 miles driven each year from new, less if we consider that the car was delivered in 2004. When it was brand new, the car was worth around $450,000 before options. In September of this year, a 2004 model with 2,700 miles sold for $1.3 million.

That means if this one goes for more than that, and it will, that the owner has made more than $50,000 a year each year by just letting it sit and rot. Well, rot might be a bit harsh.

Despite the fact that many components are still in their original break-in period, the engine has been removed recently and treated to some preventative maintenance.

Hilariously enough, the tires are from 2016 and 2018 respectively. Perhaps telling of the stature of the original owner, the listing notes the "10mm raised bucket seats".

It also comes with all of the original luggage, tools, and books included with the car from the original sale. This is one of just 644 cars that were originally sold to the US market.

We expect this car to go for north of $1.7-million. Currently, it sits at $1,315,000 with a little more than two days remaining before the end of the auction. There is a reserve price though the reserve figure is not stated.

While it's probably just a silly dream, we hope the new owner won't shrink from the opportunity to actually drive this analog supercar that was meant to be...um... driven.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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