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UPDATE: Porsche 356 "Outlaw" Is the Ultimate Villain in Quick Rendering

Fueled by social media bringing builds to our screens like never before, the aftermarket industry's love of Porsches appears to have no end. And when it comes to widebody conversions like the one in the pixel portrait sitting before us, the 356 is completely off-limits for purists. Nevertheless, that is not the main reason why we labeled the digital proposal a villain.
VW Porsche Race Carrier platform van with 356 racecar (rendering) 8 photos
Porsche 356 "Outlaw" renderingPorsche 356 "Outlaw" renderingPorsche 356 "Outlaw" renderingVW Porsche Race Carrier platform van with 356 racecar (rendering)VW Porsche Race Carrier platform van with 356 racecar (rendering)VW Porsche Race Carrier platform van with 356 racecar (rendering)VW Porsche Race Carrier platform van with 356 racecar (rendering)
At least to these eyes, this WB Porsche looks a bit like Darth Vader's helmet, especially when viewed from behind. It's all about the mix between the iconic rear-engined coupe's rounded lines and the overfenders with their floating design.

Speaking of which, the original costume of the Star Wars character didn't include a helmet. Following discussions with series creator George Lucas, concept artist Ralph McQuarrie mixed a face breathing mask, required to help Vader handle the vacuum of space, with a samurai helmet, created the legendary sci-fi design in the mid-1970s.

There was also some German DNA in there, since costume designer John Mollo used the design to come up with the costume that could be used for the camera work by mixing clerical robes, a German military helmet, as well as a military gas mask. As for the helmet featured in the original 1977 Star Wars film, it came from prop sculptor Brian Muir.

Oh, and let's not forget that Porsche itself has decided to become involved with the franchise back in 2019.

Returning to the 3D work we have here, it comes from digital artist Kalim Oozeear. And the enthusiast's wheel choice, which involves a simple design, seems to fit the custom mix. As for the color scheme of the rolling hardware, it is a match for the hues dominating the Porsche's cabin. Of course, these shades are not exactly what you'd find in the cyborg Sith Lord's wardrobe.

Given that you could hardly slide your hand in between the sports car and the surface underneath it, practicality might not be the first trait that comes to mind when contemplating the vehicle. Nevertheless, the ride height could be owed to an air suspension on its lower setting, which means the driver would have no issue adjusting the ground clearance. Besides, the vehicle's posterior now adds some hauling capacity, albeit while adding to the rear bias of the sports car's weight distribution.

Unsurprisingly, the real world is not without its outlaw Porsche 356 builds; the example we discussed last fall is as good as any.

Update

As you'll notice in the second Insta post below, the digital artist returned to the matter and it looks like he's built a small universe around the said 356.

And the fresh work ranges from an all-black attire for the sportscar, which fits the Darth Vader theme like a glove, to a Volkswagen Type 2 van that can haul the vehicle around.

The latter somehow brings memories of the original Porsche Renndienst (racing service) van, a high-roof Volkswagen Type 2 that offered technical support for Porsche's European motorsport operation in the late 1950s and early 1960s. You know, the one the automaker brought back as an electric concept via the Porsche Unseen initiative.

Then again, this approach adds a pair of wheels and quite a bit of real estate, since we're talking about a platform contraption, one whose racing aroma is as strong as they come.




 
 
 
 
 

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