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Peugeot 2008 Urban Cross is a Special Edition Model Tailored for the UK

Built in France, Brazil, and China, the Peugeot 2008 was a hit for the bench manufacturer since it started production in 2013. Underpinned by the same PSA PF1 platform employed by the Peugeot 208 and Citroen C4 Cactus, this is no all-wheel drive mini crossover, but a FWD runaround. All the more reasons a special edition suits the 2008’s character.
Peugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special Edition 9 photos
Peugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special EditionPeugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special EditionPeugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special EditionPeugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special EditionPeugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special EditionPeugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special EditionPeugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special EditionPeugeot 2008 Urban Cross Special Edition
Specifically developed for the British market, the 2015 Peugeot 2008 Urban Cross is now available to order from £16,495 on-the-road. Coming as standard with a beautiful emerald metallic paint job, the Urban Cross edition features extremely obvious styling enhancements both inside and out. For starters, the black 17-inch alloy wheels and the orange-and-blue stripes on the sides are the name of the game.

The moment you open the door, you’re greeted by sill plates that read “Urban Cross” and a set of floor mats that mirror the orange-and-blue stripes above the rocker panels. Hop inside and you’re bathed in a sea of faux carbon fiber, funky-looking seats with turquoise stitching and gray fabric inserts, as well as leather on the steering wheel and gear knob. On the technological front, customers get Grip Control, electric and heated folding side mirrors, rear parking sensors, air conditioning, and touchscreen infotainment.

Since it was launched in mid-year 2013, the Peugeot 2008 was produced in over 250,000 units, with 30,000 bought by British customers. They’re favorite engine options are the exactly what you can get on the 2008 Urban Cross special edition, namely, a 1.2-liter petrol and a 1.6-liter oil burner. Peugeot complements both of these engines with stop&start tech.

In the 1.2-liter PureTech’s case, we’re dealing with 110 bhp and an average of 99 grams of CO2 per kilometer. Believe it or not, the 100 bhp 1.6-liter BlueHDi is cleaner still (95 grams per kilometer) and torquier than the 1.2-liter three-cylinder turbo petrol as it develops 254 Nm (187 lb-ft) of FWD oomph.

 
 
 
 
 

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