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Parked for 20 Years, This 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Still Flexes the Magic Combo

If you wanted a really rare Oldsmobile Cutlass back in 1971, the best option was the 4-door station wagon fitted with a six-cylinder engine, as it’s believed only approximately 50 such units ended up seeing the daylight.
1971 Cutlass Supreme 19 photos
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On the other hand, the most common choices were the Cutlass S V8 and the Cutlass Supreme, both in 2-door Holiday Hardtop body styles. In both cases, Oldsmobile built more than 60,000 units for this model year.

The Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme that you see here is a project that seems to come with a highly desirable combination in the restoration business: it’s still original, still complete, and still unmolested.

In theory, this sounds like a very intriguing gem, but eBay seller escott930 says the car has actually been repainted to the original black color at one point during its life. So if you’re interested in buying this Cutlass, you’d better look into the unmolested claim given the repaint.

With the same owner since 1985, the car continues to come with the original 350 (5.7-liter) Rocket V8 paired with a 3-speed automatic transmission.

However, after spending some 2 decades in storage, the condition of the engine is as mysterious as it gets. We do know it was running before the Cutlass was parked back in 2002, but right now, it’s up to the buyer to figure out if any major fixes are required on this front or not.

Obviously, it’s a project that also requires some metal work, but on the other hand, the surface rust that can be observed in the provided photos doesn’t look like something that should make buyers walk away.

On the other hand, what could end up becoming a major roadblock for this Oldsmobile’s return to the road is the selling price. The bidding is currently at $2,500, but a reserve is also in place, so there’s a chance the seller expects to sell the car for much more money.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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