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Pagani Huayra "Codalunga" Belts Out 829 HP, $7.4M Special Edition Already Sold Out

Pagani discontinued the Huayra from their lineup in 2018, after 100 units of the ravishingly beautiful coupe. But as it is often the case with low-volume hypercars, the Huayra isn’t gone for good. Pagani still makes special editions of the V12-engined hypercar, and the latest of the bunch is baptized Codalunga, the Italian equivalent to McLaren’s Longtail genre.
2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition) 13 photos
2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)2022 Pagani Huayra Codalunga (long-tailed special edition)
But first, how did the long-tailed Huayra come into being? Horacio Pagani explains that a couple of collectors asked him to produce such a vehicle in 2018, when the coupe was on its way out. A model which would feel at home on the road as well as on display at international Concours events, to be specific. Both clients had been actively involved in the development, collaborating with the Grandi Complicazioni special projects arm.

Limited to five units, which are spoken for already, the Codalunga is described as a less-is-more affair even though the small details add up to an incredibly complex visual feast. Simple and hearty in essence, this limited-run hypercar starts at €7 million (nearly $7.4 at current exchange rates).

Following in the footsteps of the Huayra Tricolore from December 2020, the Huayra Codalunga packs 829 horsepower (make that 840 metric ponies) at 5,900 revolutions per minute and 811 pound-feet (1,100 Nm) of torque from 2,000 to 5,600 revolutions per minute. It’s not exactly up there with the McLaren Speedtail and other current-gen hypercars, but hey, remember that we’re dealing with a combustion-only powertrain that shows its age.

Pagani still uses the M158 twin-turbocharged V12 from German automaker Mercedes-Benz. This mill dates back to the M275 of 2003, itself based on the M137 naturally-aspirated V12 that launched in 1998. It’s rather archaic in many respects, including the SOHC valvetrain and three valves per cylinder. Be that as it may, it’s a savage powerplant that sounds incredibly good. The acceleration isn’t exactly bad either, given that Pagani quotes a dry weight of 1,280 kilograms (2,822 pounds) for the latest specification.

“We made the Codalunga longer and smoother, as if it had been caressed and molded by the wind, to design lines that were even more elegant than the coupe,” declared big kahuna Horacio Pagani. “We drew inspiration from the long tails of the 1960s that raced at Le Mans, which had very clean lines. The Codalunga comprises few essential elements; we have taken away rather than added. Simplifying is not at all straightforward, and this vehicle is, above all, the result of a complex pursuit of simple ideas,” he added.




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