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Oyo Is a Hydraulic, Chainless e-Bike That Aims to Reinvent Cycling
Every once in a while, an e-bike maker steps forward with claims of having reinvented the wheel. Oyo could also be that, except that B.C. Bikes promises it's “not just another bicycle company.”

Oyo Is a Hydraulic, Chainless e-Bike That Aims to Reinvent Cycling

Oyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your lifeOyo e-Bike has hydraulic drivetrain, promises the smoothest ride of your life
Now crowdfunding on IndieGoGo, here is a prototype of a bike that makes incredibly bold claims: it will deliver the smoothest ride you have ever experienced, seamless transition between gears, exactly the kind of motor assistance you need, and will be nearly maintenance-free. This is Oyo.

Chains on bikes can be messy and fussy. They tend to come off, they need constant maintenance, and they can ruin your pants if you’re not careful. Apparently, these are among the biggest gripes against chains, according to B.C. Bikes. So it’s been working on a bike, an electric bicycle no less, that removes the chain altogether and replaces it with a hydraulic drivetrain.

Oyo incorporates a closed-loop system that’s closed off from water and dirt, through which hydraulic fluid runs. You pedal and pump hydraulic fluid into the hydraulic motor, which makes the rear wheel spin. “The pressurized liquid flows inside the bicycle frame to the rear wheel, and the hydraulic motor utilizes the energy by way of the liquid to rotate the wheel, creating a smooth ride uninterrupted by rough transitions,” B.C. Bikes says.

By using a variety of sensors, including speed, cadence, and torque, Oyo is able to automatically shift gears depending on your needs. To paraphrase the makers, the hydraulic drivetrain means that Oyo has no gears. At the same time, though, it also has ALL the gears, delivering a seamless transition from one to another that you will never feel – and, above all, not have to bother about.

Power comes from a bottom bracket electric motor described as “powerful,” but it’s actually a standard European-spec 250W. It’s an Oli eBikes Systems Motor with five modes of pedal assist, which the rider can choose by using the integrated handlebar display. It delivers up to 400 percent of the applied strength, which means you get just the right amount of torque whether you’re riding up a hill or on a flat surface. Motor assistance is up to 25 kph (15.5 mph), after which it cuts off, and you’re on your own.

The battery is 400WH, good for an estimated range of 80 km (49.7 miles). It's located in the down tube and can be removed for charging indoors or in between rides if you’re making a stop. The system start is with pedal pressure, and not rotation, as is common with most of the e-bikes on the market right now.

“Near-zero maintenance,” the makers promise. “No chain, no sprocket and no derailleur, zero exposed moving parts, and the entire mechanism is closed and sealed from water and dirt.” Moreover, in case something happens with the hydraulic drivetrain during the three years of warranty, you can simply detach the closed mechanism and ship it in for repairs, instead of sending the entire bike. This should save you some cash in terms of shipping costs.

Oyo comes with a 6061 aluminum frame, alloy rims, and 29” wheels with hydraulic disc brakes. Extra accessories include front and back lights, fenders, and a cargo rack in the back. It pairs with the Oyo app, which works as an extra anti-theft mechanism, by basically bricking the bike. Even if a thief cuts through your bike lock, they wouldn’t be able to ride away into the sunset with it.

For an e-bike that presents such a sleek appearance, the Oyo is rather on the heavy side, but you can chalk that up to the hydraulic drivetrain. It comes in at hydraulic 25 kg (55.12 pounds) and is rated for 120 kg (264.5 pounds).

But that’s meant to be a small compromise for a bike that basically aims to reinvent the pleasure of cycling, whether with or without motor assistance. “It's like when automatic shifting replaced manual, or when power steering became the standard... That's what OYO does for e-bikes,” the makers proudly declare.

Right now, Oyo is available for pledgers for $1,999, with an MRSP of $3,600. Mass production is supposed to start in April 2022, with a delivery date set for June of that same year. Even if you do believe all these promises, that’s a very long wait to ride like a boss.



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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