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Original 1959 Chevrolet Impala Sitting for 20 Years Hides Good News Under the Hood

1959 was the first year when Chevrolet offered the Impala as a stand-alone model, after previously being launched as the top-of-the-line version of the Bel Air.
1959 Chevrolet Impala 23 photos
1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala1959 Chevrolet Impala
So the 1959 Chevrolet Impala was offered with similar engine options, including a six-cylinder developing 135 horsepower and specifically aimed at whoever wanted an economical ride.

The V8 offering started with a 283 with 185 horsepower available as standard, while the options included several other versions of the same unit producing up to 250 horsepower.

The 348 (5.7-liter) was the icing on the cake, this time in the Impala lineup with four different choices, the last of which was added late in 1959 with a maximum output of 335 horsepower.

The 1959 Impala that we have here comes with a 283 (4.7-liter) under the hood, and the good news we were referring to in the headline is the original engine is there in the car and is turning freely. What we don’t know is whether this V8 still starts or not, as eBay seller leaveitonthefield says they didn’t give it a try.

The Impala was recently purchased from the previous owner (it’s not clear this is the first owner or not) after spending some 20 years on the side of the road. As a result, the car is mostly complete, and this is definitely something that you can rarely find, especially as most of the 1959 Impalas project cars come with lots of missing parts.

Approximately 95 percent of the chrome is still there, we’re being told, and the back glass is also complete and in a good condition. So overall, all of these mean you should be able to start a full restoration quite easily, though it goes without saying the car doesn’t come in its best shape, so some bodywork would also be required.

At first glance, the price of the car isn’t that high, though it all depends on what you come across upon a visual inspection. The seller expects to get at least $5,500 as part of a no-reserve auction.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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