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One of the World’s Safest Carmakers to Offer Video App in Cars, Says There’s No Danger

Earlier today, Google announced it is making the world’s favorite online video sharing platform, YouTube, available for Android Automotive-equipped cars. It didn’t take long for the carmaker that seems to be the most in love with everything the Mountain View-based behemoth is doing, Volvo, to announce it will embrace YouTube will all its power.
Volvo C40 with YouTube built-in 10 photos
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Having a company that aims to become (or remain) the maker of the safest cars in the world go for a feature that is inherently dangerous, as it could take the drivers’ eyes off the road, might seem a bit strange, but Volvo has an explanation for it. And it’s exactly the same explanation Google gave.

You see, as per the Google announcement, access to YouTube on the large screens in the car will only be permitted when the cars are stationary. That’s supposed to make using YouTube safe, and the boring wait, at say charging stations, worthwhile and more enjoyable, according to the Swedes.

“Volvo Cars does not compromise on safety and will only allow for videos to be played when the car’s is fully stationary,” it says in a statement.

YouTube should become available on Android Automotive-equipped cars later this year, but at the moment, we’re left with a number of questions about how this is supposed to work.

The biggest of them all has to do with the time a car has to spend in the same spot for the system to unlock YouTube. Sure, Volvo is right in pointing out that using the video app while stationary is as safe as it gets, but people have always proven very creative in circumventing restrictions, and having, for instance, the smallest of glitches allowing YouTube to run after a few seconds’ stop might prove tricky.

We'll have to wait for the first full integration of the system to arrive to get answers. Coincidently, it is Volvo who will become the first automaker “to integrate an infotainment system powered by Android with Google apps and services built in.”

Editor's note: Gallery contains images of Android Automotive applications on other cars.

press release
 
 
 
 
 

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