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Once-Yellow 1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find Was Sitting Idle Since 1979

Many automotive enthusiasts could take just a look at this Corvette that’s up for grabs after decades of neglect and then decide the C3 would be a great restoration project for the weekend (or, rather, weekends – because it does need quite a lot of work). After all, some of the aficionados out there will just say “this was the Corvette of our youth,” and get right down to work.
1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale 15 photos
1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale1968 Chevrolet Corvette Barn Find for sale
Any such endeavor must start from somewhere before turning into a family-owned classic car or the next showstopper, so this 1968 Chevrolet Corvette waiting on eBay for someone to pay a little more than its current bid of $4,850 is as good as any other C3 example.

If we are to believe the seller’s description, it’s actually way better than a regular ‘68 from the third generation of “America’s sports car,” because the inspection sticker allegedly warrants the barn find in an official manner. If true, this ‘Vette that was once yellow has been sitting idle and just waiting for someone to snatch it out of the forced retirement since way back in 1979.

And the good news keeps coming, because the Safari Yellow Corvette has a VIN number of 901, meaning it could turn into a proper collector’s item since it’s one of the first 1,000 C3 Chevrolet Corvettes produced by General Motors.

In the current state it won’t add much to its value, though, even if we consider that C2 Sting Rays were probably still being produced just a few weeks prior to this unit coming out of the assembly line.

Now for the unwelcome news, starting off with originality not being part of the heritage of this unit – as the seller notes “the motor currently in this car has a pad stamp of CE2496, which is an over-the-counter exchange motor, likely a 1969 350... I have not attempted to turn the engine, but it is not seized.”

We can all see for ourselves the body’s former Safari Yellow glory is but a distant memory, and it gets even worse for the “white soft-top that is merely a frame today.” The description also details the rest of the issues, such as cut fender flares, cracks that have appeared all over the place, or the frame being mostly covered in rust.

 
 
 
 
 

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