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Old Yamaha SR500 the Motohangar Way

Taking a good look at Motohangar's take on the old (and faithful) Yamaha SR500, one will really understand that bike modding done on a budget can also be extremely good-looking. Virginia-based workshop Motohangar wanted to experiment a bit and build a bike for themselves and showcase their skills.
Yamaha SR500 by Motohangar 17 photos
Photo: Motohangar
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John Brindley was the man behind the project, says Pat Jones, head of Motohangar and that's why there's a 'B' in the signature on the tank. John fitted new rear shocks on the SR500 to make it lower and add to the stability as well as improve steering, and decided to go for a very clean look.

All wiring has been reworked and kept to the minimum requirements, while the electrics have been tucked under the seat, including the keyed ignition switch. Keeping the bike in the retro styling needed vintage head and tail light, both modified to work with modern-era bulbs.

Even the Yoshimura exhaust is a vintage one, taken from a sport bike in the 80's. After deciding that the modded SR500 needed no paint and the color of the bare polished metal looked sportier than anything, a dash of tone was added: a dyed leather seat evoking the bikes of yore, contracting beautifully with the rest of the build. And of course, classic Firestones shoeing the restored, powder-coated rims. Seen on BikeEXIF.
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