autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

NTSB Wants Videos, Pictures, and Testimonies to Solve Coral Gable Tesla Crash

NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) is wasting no time trying to understand what made a Tesla Model 3 hit a tree and burn in Coral Gables on September 13. After starting investigations on September 20, the safety board is now asking witnesses of the crash to help the experts determine what happened. Anyone that filmed, photographed, or just saw what occurred should contact NTSB through the email address [email protected]
NTSB Asks for Help to Solve Tesla Coral Gables Crash 20 photos
Tesla Model S Affected By Arson in Norway With Unaffected Battery PackTesla Model S Fire in San Ramon, CaliforniaTesla Model 3 Fire in North Park, San DiegoTesla Model 3 Fire in North Park, San DiegoTesla Model 3 Fire in North Park, San DiegoTesla Model 3 Fire in North Park, San DiegoTesla Model 3 Fire in North Park, San DiegoTesla Model S Plaid FireTesla Model S Plaid FireTesla Model S Plaid FireTesla Model S Plaid FireTesla Model S Plaid FireTesla Model S Plaid FireTesla Model S Plaid FireTesla SuspensionTesla SuspensionTesla Suspension IssuesTesla Suspension IssuesAlhambra Circle, Where the Coral Gables Tesla Model 3 Crash Happened
At least one person has footage of the collision, as we have already reported here at autoevolution. Ian Linder Sheldon was driving at Alhambra Circle by the same time the Tesla was also there. His video allowed us to determine it was a Model 3 and not an SUV, as the first reports made it seem.

According to Sheldon, the Model 3 overtook his car, accelerated to make a yellow light, hit a bump, jumped several feet, swerved to the left, and hit two trees, immediately catching fire. The crash happened in a residential area with a speed limit of 30 mph. Sheldon calculated the speed of the Tesla, and it would not be at more than 35 mph when everything happened. Hopefully, NTSB is already in touch with him to get the video, statement, and other images he made.

Two people died in the collision: the 20-year-old driver and a 19-year-old female passenger. Their identities have not been revealed so far. Considering the families have asked witnesses to remove videos and pictures of the accident from social media, it may take a while for them to disclose who was involved with the crash.

From what we learned from Sheldon, Autopilot was not active and was not involved with the collision. That still does not make it look like an ordinary wreck for two aspects: why the car lost control in such a violent way at low speed and why it caught fire so fast.

Tesla vehicles have a long record of suspension problems that could have contributed to the driver losing control. The battery pack should also be more protected to avoid catching fire so fast, which could eventually have given time for the car occupants to leave the vehicle or be removed from it by first responders. That is what NTSB must be focusing on to determine. If you happen to have any info about the incident, make sure you get in touch with the safety board.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories