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Not All Convertibles Are Destined for Greatness, This 1985 Cavalier Is Classic Proof

Not every drop-top convertible is bound to be a classic of its generation. Some convertibles throughout history have even managed to be downright forgettable. Just take this 1985 Chevrolet Cavalier Type 10 Convertible we found for sale.
Chevy Cavalier Convertible 11 photos
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For those who aren't familiar with the North American Chevy Cavalier, it's safe to call it a Honda Civic or Toyota Camry alternative that GM tried to market as the all-American version of reliable Japanese import economy cars. Entering production back in 1981, the Cavalier pulled the work four or five separate models would today.

It came in a coupe, hatchback, sedan, wagon, and of course, a convertible variety during its seven years in production. It shared a W-body platform with other GM economy cars of the day like the Buick Skyhawk, Pontiac Sunbird, and Cadillac Cimarron. A total of four different engines were available for the Cavalier platform during its first generation, rranging from 1.8 to two liters and even a 2.8 liter V6.

Although the official listing for this particular vehicle indicates, this one has a two-liter four-pot. Power is fed through an automatic transmission, in this case of either a three or five-speed variety, although a four-speed manual was also an option for the Cavelier line at the time.

Of the two million and change units of the Cavalier produced between 1981 and 1987, only 21,832 were the convertible variety or a minute fraction of the total production volume. With this in mind, it's a real treat to see one live and in the flesh in 2022. One can only assume the rest of its brethren found themselves rusting into the Earth from whence it came by now or met an unfortunate end in a county scrap yard.

With 122,800 miles (197,627 km) on the odometer, this Cavalier is by no means a garage darling. It's not like it was ever designed to achieve that status, though, so it's not all that surprising. But that said, the factory red paint with black cloth interior seems to have held up remarkably well, considering the company who built it and the period it was manufactured in.

You may have to take a needle and some thread to the front seat bottom, but that's a small price to pay to get some sun and wind in your face on a weekend trip to somewhere in the great outdoors. The price for this little survivor is a measly $5,995 out of Fuelin Fine Auto Sales in Saylorsburg, Pennsylvania. Or around what it costs to maintain a late model Porsche 911 convertible for a few years without a warranty. Even better, with the Cavalier, there won't be any excessive monthly car payments after the fact.

Check back soon for more from Open Top Month here on autoevolution.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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