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Nimbus Halo Is a Three-Wheel EV That Promises the World at an Affordable Price
Electric vehicles are the future, but no one said they have to be with four or two wheels only. In a sea of electric passenger cars and electric two-wheelers, be they bikes or scooters, three-wheelers are also begging for some attention.

Nimbus Halo Is a Three-Wheel EV That Promises the World at an Affordable Price

The Nimbus Halo is legally an electric motorcycle that's halfway between a bike and a carThe Nimbus Halo is legally an electric motorcycle that's halfway between a bike and a carThe Nimbus Halo is legally an electric motorcycle that's halfway between a bike and a carThe Nimbus Halo is legally an electric motorcycle that's halfway between a bike and a carThe Nimbus Halo is legally an electric motorcycle that's halfway between a bike and a carThe Nimbus Halo is legally an electric motorcycle that's halfway between a bike and a carThe Nimbus Halo is legally an electric motorcycle that's halfway between a bike and a car
Nimbus Halo is one of these three-wheelers (hat tip to InsideEVs). It’s legally a motorcycle, but it’s enclosed and boasts safety features similar to those found in a conventional car. It’s all-electric and, because of its size, very convenient in heavy traffic, not to mention cheap to run and maintain. It also leans in on turns and, if you’re not impressed yet, it boasts a price tag that’s less than what you’d pay for some premium electric bicycles.

That’s a lot to unpack. That’s also a very admirable and seemingly impossible goal to reach, so here’s to hoping Nimbus has what it takes. Because if the Halo makes it to market,  it will be quite a disruptor in the current configuration and at the estimated price.

Nimbus plans to offer two models of the Halo, the Halo and the X. There are few differences between the two, except for some carbon fiber thrown onto the X and increased range and speed. The idea is the same for both: a vehicle for urban commuters looking for something as efficient and convenient as a motorcycle, but that is safe and offers weather protection like a regular car.

You have a two-seat configuration in tandem, though the rear seat could be generously described as cramped. Nimbus says that, despite what you might think, you also have some room to store groceries, so there’s that.

The Halo's biggest selling point is that it’s tiny: its size is comparable to a motorcycle, but you’re safer in it than on the bike. That’s because Halo comes with frontal and curtain airbags, as well as Lane Departure Warning and Automated Emergency Braking. It also has automated parking, over-the-air updates, and a bunch of sensors and actuators for Nimbus Balance, the proprietary tech that helps it lean in on turns.

Inside the cabin, you get heating as standard and AC as optional, Bluetooth speakers, and an infotainment display. Clearly, this isn’t a vehicle that will instantly get you thinking “ultra-comfort,” but it will do the job, considering what it’s been designed for. Whenever you need something to zap around the city quickly but not break a sweat or have to suffer the elements, this would be just the thing.

Nimbus says Halo is three times greener than the average electric car because it’s smaller and has better efficiency (also due to its size). Power comes from an 8.1 kWh battery, upgradable to a 12.4 kWh pack for an estimated range of 78 miles (126 km) and 119 miles (191 km) of city driving, respectively. Regenerative braking is included. Finally, the top speed is rated at 50 mph (80 kph) for the Halo and 90 mph (145 kph) for the X.

Nimbus aims to sell these trikes as personal vehicles and offer them as rentals via a subscription service. The latter option will come with access to the network of chargers and designated free parking, among other perks.

Described as the perfect “daily driver” that boasts “levels of protection unheard in personal mobility,” the Nimbus Halo is, on paper, the kind of vehicle that sounds almost too good to be true. Acknowledging it doesn’t make you a hater, and neither does it have to diminish your level of anticipation or whatever hope you have placed in the project.

There is one more thing that adds to the overall impression of “too good”: the price. Nimbus says pricing starts at $6,420, with a variety of payment plans possible, and deliveries expected worldwide for mid- to late-2022.



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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