autoevolution
 

New Saab Guided Munition Makes Short Work of Concrete Walls and Armored SUV

Saab GMM hitting armored SUV 9 photos
Photo: Raytheon Technologies/Youtube
Saab and Raytheon successfully test new guided munitionSaab and Raytheon successfully test new guided munitionSaab and Raytheon successfully test new guided munitionSaab and Raytheon successfully test new guided munitionSaab and Raytheon successfully test new guided munitionSaab and Raytheon successfully test new guided munitionSaab and Raytheon successfully test new guided munitionSaab and Raytheon successfully test new guided munition
Ever since 2017, the U.S. Army, together with Swedish company Saab and America's Raytheon Missiles & Defense have been working on a new Guided Multipurpose Munition. GMM, for short, the piece of technology was successfully tested back in November 2020, but we’re only now hearing about it.
According to a statement Saab released this week, the GMM was put through its paces during a live-fire exercise in November 2020 at the Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona. It was then when the munition was tested for the first time during a series of launches with live warheads.

The GMM was fired from Saab’s own Carl-Gustaf recoilless rifle and one of its AT disposable launchers, which was slightly modified. Once out of the weapons, the GMM was guided to its targets through “a semi-active laser guidance system and designator.”

As per Saab, the weapon was capable of hitting targets at distances between 1,550 and 2,500 meters (1 to 1.5 miles). Because of the way it was made, with a break-in charge to soften the target up and a follow-through charge to shred it to bits, the GMM had no issues destroying brick or double-reinforced concrete walls, and even an armored vehicle.

The success rate was deemed to be 100 percent, which is an extremely desirable trait when it comes to military technology.

Once ready (an exact date for deployment is not known), the weapon should achieve impressive results. It can fly toward its target at near-supersonic speeds, and it is suitable for a wide range of platforms, from disposable and reloadable shoulder-fired systems, to mortars, and manned and unmanned ground and aerial vehicles.

Considered by its makers and the Army the “next step in the evolution of our shoulder-launched systems,” the GMM is being funded through the Rapid Innovation Funding (RIF) program.

If you liked the article, please follow us:  Google News icon Google News Youtube Instagram
Press Release
About the author: Daniel Patrascu
Daniel Patrascu profile photo

Daniel loves writing (or so he claims), and he uses this skill to offer readers a "behind the scenes" look at the automotive industry. He also enjoys talking about space exploration and robots, because in his view the only way forward for humanity is away from this planet, in metal bodies.
Full profile

 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories