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New Eco-Floating Hotel Spins to Generate Energy, Aims at Full Self-Sufficiency
If the recently announced projects indicate the direction humanity is heading, we’re about to occupy the high seas. Floating real estate is the latest in premium real estate, so here’s another example of that.

New Eco-Floating Hotel Spins to Generate Energy, Aims at Full Self-Sufficiency

The Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficientThe Eco-Floating Hotel eyes a 2025 completion date, will be entirely self-sufficient
As early as 2025, Qatar could be the home of a new floating hotel, a construction like any other that aims to combine supreme luxury and sustainability. Designed by Hayri Atak Architectural Design Studio (HAADS), the Eco-Floating Hotel (that’s the actual name of the project, at least for the time being) presents itself as a man-made island floating off the coast.

It will be connected to the mainland by a long pier, but access to the floating island will also be possible by air and by water since it has both its own helipad and port on surrounding pier extensions. These will serve as accessories to the main area, that of the luxury hotel, which spins in place to generate energy.

HAADS is not exactly generous with the details on the official website, but a spokesperson tells the New Atlas that they’re now conducting feasibility and technical studies and that they’re eyeing a 2025 completion date. We’re three months into 2021 as of the time of writing, and a project of this magnitude will definitely take plenty of time, but as they say, the sky’s the limit when the budget is limitless.

The same media outlet notes that the island itself will measure 35,000 square-meters (376,000 square-feet), including annexes. It sits on several floating platforms, which would, in theory, allow it to withstand rough weather and high waves. The hotel will comprise 152 rooms with very fancy amenities like private terraces, gym and wellness centers, indoor and outdoor pools. Access will be done through multiple entrances, with a circular lobby leading up to the rooms.

The hotel itself is shaped like a doughnut, with a glass roof that looks like a vortex. The reception of the hotel will be under and around the vortex. In addition to looking very cool, the glass roof will collect rainwater, which will then feed the greenery on the man-made island slash hotel.

The concept gets even more sci-fi from here. The Eco-Floating Hotel aims for full self-sufficiency, using all-natural resources to cover the island’s needs. It would use solar, wind, and tidal energy for that, including the energy it generates by spinning in place. A complete revolution would take 24 hours to complete, so don’t imagine it would go anything even remotely as fast as shown here.



Since the hotel floats, it could be made to spin in place with a dynamic positioning system similar to those used in ships containing thrusters and propellers. In addition to generating energy, this too would allow it to move with the elements to minimize weather impact on everything on the island. Not to mention that it would offer guests the most unique perspective ever to be enjoyed from the window of a hotel room.

The idea seems extraordinary (and it is), but it’s not the first time it’s been put into virtual practice to showcase its benefits. The winner of the 2020 Grand Prix Award for Architecture and Innovation of the Sea from Foundation Jacques Rougerie, Lenka Petráková’s 8th Continent, is a floating research center that is also self-sufficient and uses a revolving movement. This floating “island” was designed to be placed on the Great Pacific garbage patch in the North Pacific, with the goal of cleaning it up.

The Eco-Floating Hotel has a less selfless purpose, but it is nonetheless gorgeous, unique, and, as far as renders go, careful to minimize its impact on nature. Keeping in mind the 2025 completion goal, let’s hope more particulars will be unveiled as the project progresses.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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