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NASA Tells All on Scrubbed Launch of Artemis I, Rescheduled for September 3rd

Rocket science is a tricky business. That's why it shouldn't be a shock that NASA's first SLS heavy-booster rocket set to launch the Artemis I mission to send an Orion crew capsule around the Moon had at least one scrubbed launch attempt so far.
SLS Rocket 13 photos
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Just now, NASA's Office of Communications released a live press conference answering a slew of questions as to why the eight-million pounds of thrust-jetting monster couldn't launch this past Monday. Joining presenter Katherine Hamilton were John Honeycutt, Manager of the Space Launch System Program, Michael Sarafin - Artemis I Mission Manager, Charlie Blackwell-Thompson - Artemis Launch Director, and Mark Berger with the U.S. Space Force's 45th Weather Squadron.

The group began with an introductory description of the previous day's launch scrub related primarily to abnormal thermal data readings coming out of the SLS rocket's number three main engine, possibly related to a seized pump control valve. On top of a previously reported hydrogen fuel leak during the rocket's cryogenic tank fueling and reports of incoming thunderstorms, it was simply too much for NASA personnel to overcome within the 8:33 a.m. and 10:33 a.m. launch window slated for the Artemis I launch that on Monday morning. Instead, all signs point to a launch rescheduled to Saturday, September 2nd, between 2:17 and 4:17 p.m. EST.

Reports from the event point to a roughly 60 percent chance of a weather violation event taking place, according to data from Mark Berger's weather analysis team. Such violations include but are not limited to incidents of rain, lightning, thunder, high wind, and events of temperature extremes.

If any one of those criteria is violated, the launch stands a chance of being scrubbed once again. This could push the launch attempt back until at least Monday, September 5th, potentially even longer if more issues present themselves between then and now. Whether this happens or not still remains to be seen.

Check back soon for more live coverage from Cape Canaveral in Florida right here on autoevolution.

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