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Mostly-Clean 2001 Ducati 996 With Termignoni Pipes Is Getting Ready for Auction

A 996 doesn’t necessarily need to be in perfect shape to turn heads, steal hearts, and drop jaws.
2001 Ducati 996 35 photos
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Designed by the illustrious Massimo Tamburini, the Ducati 916 really made waves when it came out back in 1994. It was (and still is) widely regarded as the sexiest production motorcycle ever built, and the styling cues that made it so alluring have all been carried over to the 996 later on.

This beefed-up successor debuted in ‘99, and it would stay in production until 2002, seeing its three-spoke Brembo hoops replaced with forged Marchesinis along the way. Pictured above is a 2001 model sporting Pazzo Racing control levers, an aftermarket tail tidy, and Termignoni exhaust plumbing with twin carbon fiber silencers.

A Progrip tank protector and white headlight bulbs also make an appearance, but some TLC will still be required to make this 996 look and perform like new. The bike’s five-digit analog counter displays approximately 18k miles (29,000 km), and the next person to make those digits spin could be you!

That’s right; one may find this creature listed on Iconic Motorbike Auctions until November 23, which is when the bidding process will come to an end. The top bid of 5,500 bones doesn’t satisfy the reserve, though, so you’ll want to exercise a little more generosity if you plan on scoring this Italian stunner.

Its grunt hails from liquid-cooled 996cc Desmoquattro L-twin with dual overhead cams actuating four valves per cylinder. Joined by a six-speed gearbox and a dry multi-plate clutch, the engine is capable of spawning up to 112 hp and 69 pound-feet (93 Nm) of torque at the crankshaft.

With these power output digits on tap, Ducati’s showstopper can accelerate from zero to 60 mph (96 kph) in 3.1 seconds before hitting a top speed of 160 mph (257 kph). Suspension is managed by inverted Showa forks and a piggyback Ohlins monoshock, while braking comes from Brembo calipers mounted over 320 mm (12.6-inch) rotors up front and a 220 mm (8.7-inch) unit down south.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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