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Modernized Harley-Davidson Dyna Is Now Called BlueRock, and It's Unique

Starting with the early years of the 1990s, American bike maker Harley-Davidson introduced the Dyna line, a new breed of two-wheelers packing the then still rather new Evolution engine. The line proved successful enough to be kept in production for almost two decades until it was abruptly replaced in 2018 by an improved Softail range.
Harley-Davidson BlueRock 16 photos
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Despite being around for so long, and being extremely appreciated by some riders, one doesn’t get to see as many Dynas getting a custom job as other models from the Harley past and present do. But when one does surface, it kind of makes you feel the wait was worth it.

Kind of like this two-wheeler here, wearing the official name of BlueRock and modified into a custom Dyna piece by a Japanese shop that goes by the name Bad Land.

Starting from a stock 2011 model, Bad Land set out to gift the bike with its usual magic, making it look unique and desirable. Wearing a blue paint scheme over the main body parts, offset all over the place by incredible volumes of shiny chrome, the BlueRock sure is an interesting tribute to the Dyna family.

The build rocks a great deal of custom bits. It all starts with the custom wheels, sized 21-inch front and 18-inch rear, and wrapped in Avon Cobra tires. Higher up sit the restyled fenders, a much prominent headlight up front, and a large single seat at the rear.

The shop behind the build contributed, aside from putting the thing together, the handlebar, air cleaner, and one-off exhaust that allows the otherwise unchanged engine to breathe. These bits are topped off by a Ken’s Factory mirror, grip and footpeg, and an SJP triple tree.

Bad Land is not in the habit of telling people how much the build it makes cost, so we have no estimate for this one. For reference though, we’ll tell you the stock Dyna sold back in its day from around $15,000.

 
 
 
 
 

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