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Meet Daymak Beast 2.0, the Tough All-Terrain Scooter in e-Bike Clothing
Without a doubt, 2020 has been a great year for two-wheelers, whether of the electric or just old pedal power kind. If there’s a silver lining to the restrictions, it’s they have forced us to seek alternative means of transportation, different ways to socialize, while boosting the desire to get out of the city as often as possible.

Meet Daymak Beast 2.0, the Tough All-Terrain Scooter in e-Bike Clothing

The Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beastThe Daymak Beast 2.0 is legally an e-bike, practically a beast
That said, when it comes to doing all that on an e-bike, you still have to choose between a product for riding on smooth, paved surfaces and one that’s best fitted for off-roading. With the Beast, the choice becomes a moot point. This electric bicycle (more on that later) lives up to its name both on the road and off it.

Though dubbed an electric scooter, the Beast, from Toronto-based maker Daymak, is actually an electric bicycle, at least from a legal standpoint. It has pedals that you can use, though you probably won’t, even if you wanted to – it also has footpegs. With its range and power, traveling on torque alone is definitely the way to go. Technically, it classifies as an e-bike, which means you can own it and drive it without a license and registration, a point stressed in the ad that went out for it in October last year. 

Launched one year ago, the Beast is the second-generation of the Daymak scooter that made headlines way back in 2014 because it had solar panels strapped on top of the battery. Keep your daily travels within a range of 10 km (6.2 miles), and you could ride solely off of that, Daymak promised at the time. The OG Beast became a star on crowdfunding sites, where it raised funds to go into production, so it was natural for Daymak to want to build on that kind of interest.

Beast 2.0 is their way of doing that, a mighty, sturdy, and tough scooter-type that laughs in the face of all scooters because it’s actually more of an ATV. It’s designed for both road use and for the off-road, and it promises a good range, a cushioned ride, and some cargo space to boot.

The Beast is offered in three variants: Standard, Deluxe and Ultimate (currently listed as just D on the official website). The Beast D is the most impressive, with dual 500W motors (one in the front and one in the rear wheel), a 60V 40AH Lithium battery, and a range of up to 60 km (37.2 miles). On all three models, the battery is removable only for replacing it, but a fast charge can be achieved in 20 minutes on the D model.

This being made for offroad use as well, it sits on huge, 21x7x10-inch (53x17.7x25.4-cm) knobby tires that make “riding in the outback a breeze” and are guaranteed to get you back to civilization, whether your adventures take you on gravel, sand, mud or light snow. You might want to dress more appropriately than the dude in the video below for that, though.

There’s a suspension fork in the front and coilover shocks in the back, as well as hydraulic disc brakes in the front and rear for excellent stopping power. You also get a generous halo light for visibility on and off the road, a horn, digital display, and a rear quick-release carrier case with lock and an alarm system - you know, for those times when you need to haul some cargo but don’t want it to get dirty.

Speaking of hauling, the Beast could work for that, too. With a total payload of 150 kg (330 pounds), you can either use for cargo or even to carry an extra passenger with you – there’s plenty of room on it.

Limited to just 20 mph (32 kph) on the road, the Beast 2 comes with three riding modes, one of which allows you to unlock its full potential. Off-road mode has a top speed of 25 mph (45 kph), which should be enough considering you will be riding rough. Daymak says this and other ride customizations (acceleration, torque and range) can be made via the smartphone app, as the controller has built-in Bluetooth connectivity.

“We have redesigned the frame of our new Beast, which will deliver more comfort to the rider and passenger,” Aldo Baiocchi, president of Daymak Canada, said in 2019, at the launch of the new-gen Beast. “The new frame design of the Beast 2.0 offers a spacious flat seat and extra space for the footpegs. It's large enough to hold two people.”

Beast 2 Standard is currently priced at $3,699, while the D model retails at dealers for $6,399. You’re probably going to need that second passenger to chip in.



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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