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McLaren Plans To Increase Production Capacity, SUV Still Not Happening

From Bentley to Rolls-Royce, ultra-luxury automakers are all down for ultra-luxury, high-performance SUVs. Lamborghini has the Urus, and Ferrari is working on the hybrid V8-engined Purosangue. Given these circumstances, it’s surprising to know McLaren doesn’t want to join the club.
McLaren Speedtail 19 photos
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For years, the Woking-based automaker reiterated time and again that SUVs aren’t befitting of McLaren. Fast-forward to the present day, and the head of design stands true to his word.

“I can easily answer that and say no,” Mark Roberts told Automotive News. "We really do deliver on the ultimate driving experience. For us, it means no compromise. An SUV doesn’t allow us to deliver on that.”

Even though McLaren didn’t choose the easy way to increase production, 18 new models will be launched by 2025. Of course, a handful of special editions are included. Yearly output stands at 4,500 units, translating to 20 – 22 vehicles per day.

“It’s putting a big demand on our production facility to build more volume,” said Roberts. Given time, there’s no denying Woking can be expanded to build more mid-engine works of wonder such as the Speedtail.

Of the 18 new models, one will serve as the successor to the P1 plug-in hybrid hypercar. “I can’t tell you when [it will be launched], but it’s coming up soon on our design schedule,” clarified the head of design.

An all-electric vehicle “is already in testing and development,” but that one will have to wait a little bit more to come to fruition. Like everyone in this segment, the weight of the lithium-ion battery is the biggest enemy of handling.

“It’s clearly part of our future,” concluded Roberts. On a related note, McLaren’s twin-turbo V8 is expected to be joined by a six-cylinder engine in the years to come. Chief executive officer Mike Flewitt said two years ago at the Geneva Motor Show that the number of cylinders isn’t of the essence as long as the performance attributes are appropriate.

 
 
 
 
 

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