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McDonnell Douglas F-15 Getting Passive Active Warning Survivability System

It sounds fancy, we know, but BAE Systems’ Eagle Passive Active Warning Survivability System (EPAWSS) can be seen like nothing more than an electronic shield protecting fighter jets in contested airspace. And starting this year, the U.S. Air Force’s McDonnell Douglas F-15 will be getting it.
Boeing/McDonnell Douglas F-15 13 photos
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Boeing, now the owner of McDonnell Douglas, gave BAE a $58 million contract to start initial production of the EPAWSS system for deployment in fighter jets, in a bid to provide them with “advanced electromagnetic capabilities.”

More to the point, EPAWSS comprises a wide range of multispectral sensors to detect incoming threats. Using signal processing, microelectronics, and intelligent algorithms, it is capable of giving the plane’s pilot radar warning, situational awareness, geolocation, and, most importantly, self-protection capabilities. It makes F-15 pilots not only capable of monitoring threats, but also jam or deceive them.

“The start of EPAWSS production marks a critical milestone and is a testament to the dedication and commitment of our industry team,”
said in a statement Jerry Wohletz, vice president and general manager of Electronic Combat Solutions at BAE Systems.

“Our technology is cutting-edge, our factories are world-class, and our people are innovative and mission-focused.”

The F-15 has been in the air above battlefields since 1976, having been an important tool in some of America’s most recent wars. In its current configuration, it is capable of flying at speeds of up to Mach 2.5, and for as far as 1,221 miles (1,965 km).

Powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbofans with afterburners, it can carry a maximum weapons payload of 29,500 pounds (over 13 tons), including guns and missiles, but also smart and precision weapons.

The F-15 is presently in the service of six countries besides the U.S., namely Japan, Israel, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and Qatar.

press release
 
 
 
 
 

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