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Maxx Shows Up to Urban Mobility Game as an Electric Moped Priced Under $2K
There's no doubt that urban mobility is booming, and with supply and demand being what it is, the more products hit the market, the lower the prices we will be seeing.

Maxx Shows Up to Urban Mobility Game as an Electric Moped Priced Under $2K

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One recent startup to hit the market, SWFT, has made it their business to offer ordinary humans the possibility of getting into the urban mobility game. You may have seen some of their work earlier this week, as I've been putting out some of their best gear for you to see. This time around, you'll be getting to know the Maxx, an electric moped made to help you zip around city streets and urban traffic as if you're not part of the scenery.

You already picked up that the Maxx is an electric moped, but it may surprise you to find that this trinket is only going to run you 2,000 USD (1,720 EUR at current exchange rates) to own. To put things a little into perspective, some non-electric bicycles on the market cost more than this electrified two-wheeler—time to see what sort of electric moped SWFT has in store for this price.

To get a clear idea of what we're up against, it helps to run through a few specs, so you can have a mental image of how big the Maxx is. You're looking at a moped with a width of 26.4 inches (67 centimeters), a height of 40.9 inches (104 centimeters), and a length of 67.7 inches (172 centimeters), small enough to weave through New York traffic. With a weight of 161.4 lbs (73 kg), you'd better be sure you know how to handle this sort of heavier machinery.

One of the neat things about the Maxx is that you won't need a license to ride it. Why? Technically, this moped is considered a Class 2 adult bike, meaning that you can ride away even without pedaling as it's throttle assisted. When the half-twist throttle is activated, a 400-watt brushless rear hub motor kicks in and can move you and the scooter around town with speeds upwards of 19.8 mph (32 kph). I know, I know, it's only 19.8 mph, but this is one of the reasons why this moped can be used as a perfect tool to help first-time riders get the hang of this sort of machinery.

Powering the motor is a battery system. Hidden underneath the seat and charged via an external port, a 48-volt 20 amp-hour battery is enough to give the Maxx a range of 38 miles (61 kilometers). Again, it may not sound like much, but this is well within everyday travel norms. I remember taking out the Horwin EK3 for a test ride, and in two days, I only racked up around 50 miles (80 kilometers) of travel around town. With a lithium-ion polymer composition, once your battery is drained, it'll take up to 10 hours to recharge. Your best option here is to pick up another battery pack and leave the worry of range behind. With features like an LCD, hydraulic shock absorbers, disc brakes, fenders, and a cushioned seat, safety and comfort are covered too.

If you feel that the speed cap of 19.8 mph doesn't appeal to you, word of advice is to find yourself a friend with good electronics and software skills and figure out if you can break the software-set speed cap for the Maxx. If you do this, I urge you to check your local laws and always wear a helmet.

Now, here's a bit of some good news. In my search for information on the Maxx, I ran across a website known as Best Buy, you know, the electronics megastore. Well, it would seem that they have a sale on the Maxx and are advertising it for 1,699 USD (1,461 EUR at current exchange rates). As far as how long this offers lasts or what you have to do to get it, I don't know. I'm just the messenger; message complete.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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