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Matching-Numbers 1969 Chevelle SS 396 Shows Exactly Why Barn Finds Deserve Another Chance

1969 was the year when the SS 396 was relegated to an optional package for the Chevelle, after being offered as a stand-alone series for just two years.
1969 Chevelle SS 396 17 photos
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It’s not hard to figure out what big block was in charge of putting the wheels in motion given the car’s name, but on the other hand, several versions of the 396 (6.5-liter) were offered on the SS.

The standard unit, also known as RPO code L35, was fitted with a four-barrel Rochester carburetor, so it developed 325 horsepower. The L34, however, upgraded the power rating to 350 horsepower if customers were willing to pay a little over $120.

The more powerful options were the L78 and the L89, both of which produced 375 horsepower and were equipped with Holley 4150 four-barrel carburetors.

While we don’t know precisely what version of the original engine was supposed to get this Chevrolet moving when it rolled off the assembly lines, the car now comes without a powerplant, obviously after spending many years in storage.

Described as a genuine barn find, this Chevelle still comes with the original Turbo 400 transmission, seller dgail36 claims in a listing on eBay. And the lack of an engine isn’t such a big deal if what you’re interested in is a restomod, though it’s not a surprise if someone planning a restoration to factory specs walks away at this point.

Clearly, the condition of this Chevelle isn’t the best. There’s rust here and there, and some parts of the metal, such as floors, might need to be replaced completely if you don’t want to fix the big holes it comes with right now.

Restoring this true SS clearly won’t be easy. However, the car is described as a very solid restoration candidate, with most parts still there (some of them are currently in the trunk, so you may not be able to see them in the provided pics).

The biggest shortcoming appears to be the price. The seller isn’t willing to let the car go for less than $19,500, and given the original engine is no longer there, this is quite an ambitious expectation at the end of the day.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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