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Lucid Delivers First Units of the Air Dream Edition to Customers

Peter Rawlinson told the first clients to receive a Lucid Air that the company would not “have achieved a damn thing” until they had their cars. On October 30, the automaker that this CEO leads managed to say it finally did so. That happened after Lucid delivered about 20 vehicles in an official ceremony that took place in California, as promised before.
Lucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to Customers 11 photos
Lucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to CustomersLucid Air Dream Edition First Deliveries to Customers
The event called Dream Delivery allowed Rawlinson to present the luxury electric sedan's impressive technical details and talk to Lucid's first clients. According to the EPA's official rating, the Dream Edition will have 520 units – the same number of miles the company managed to extract from a 118 kWh battery pack.

After taking the new owners on a 65-mile (105 km) journey with the vehicles, Lucid bragged about that fantastic range in a tweet that mentioned they still had 455 miles (732 km) to go on a full charge. What makes the range most impressive is the fact that Lucid achieved it by heavily investing in energy efficiency.

The Lucid Air Dream Edition can run 4.4 miles (7 km) per kWh. Its closest competitor in terms of energy efficiency by EPA numbers is the Model S Long Range. With an official EPA range of 405 miles (651 km) and a 103.9-kWh battery pack according to EPA’s Certificate Summary Information, it reaches 3.89 mi/kWh (6.26 km/kWh) The Mercedes-Benz EQS 450+ got a 350-mile (563 km) EPA range with a 111.3-kWh battery pack, resulting in 3.14 mi/kWh (5.06 km/kWh)

Ironically, WLTP numbers invert those positions. The EQS 450+ would have up to 785 km (487.7 miles) of range. Divided by the 111.3 kWh its battery pack offers, we get 7 km/kWh (4.35 mi/kWh). Tesla informs 652 km (405 miles) of range in its European websites, under the WLTP testing cycle. With its 103.9-kWh battery pack, its energy consumption is 6.28 km/kWh (3.9 mi/kWh). Weird, right?

Despite the testing cycle differences, it is evident that Lucid managed to beat its older competitors in the EV market with impressive numbers. Above all, no one will be able to claim anymore that Lucid is only making promises. If that was the parameter for evaluating anything, we know of other companies pledging things they can’t deliver for a long time. That was never an issue for its supporters: talk about coherence.

 
 
 
 
 

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