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Los Angeles Auto Show 2015 to Feature No Less than 30 World Debuts

This wonderful automotive year will be finishing off in style with the Los Angeles Auto Show, set to open its gates to the public on November 20, and close them nine days later.
L.A. Auto Show 1 photo
However, as usual, press days will be happening earlier, so you can count on us to spoil as many of the surprises the show is hiding as we can. And there will be plenty of them. 30, to be more precise.

This year’s news comes from many sources, and it’s fascinating to witness the dramatic and swift changes that are transforming the automotive business,” said Lisa Kaz, the show’s president.

Among the most hotly anticipated launches, there are Mercedes-Benz’s GLS SUV and SL roadster (both with facelifts), the all-new Buick LaCrosse sedan, Land Rover Range Rover Evoque Convertible, the new Nissan Sentra, Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport, and two new models from Mitsubishi: the Mirage and the Outlander Sport.

And the list goes on: Fiat will bring their take on the Mazda Miata (most likely going to be called 124), while Mazda announced a new version of its CX-9 crossover. Further on, Ford, Subaru, Volvo and Volkswagen are all expected to bring new models to the Californian motor show.

Apart from the 30 world debuts, the American market is going to enjoy a number of debuts of its own, with the vehicles first shown in Frankfurt making a first appearance in the New World, as well as those coming to Tokyo next week. All in all, this will make for over 50 debuts for the North American market.

The show will also feature a technology exhibition focusing on the ever growing influence of tech in the automotive industry. Speaking to Automotive News, Brendan Flynn, vice president of marketing for the L.A. Auto Show, said, “It’s not just about new vehicles anymore. The underlying theme is where the auto industry is headed. It’s going to be what the startup and the technology companies are doing and how manufacturers are changing how they look at their business model.

What sets the L.A. Auto Show apart from other similar events is the fact that it’s not owned by a dealer association, something that allows it to view the industry in a much more relaxed manner and invite companies pushing for change that would not be welcomed elsewhere.

The first press day of the L.A. Auto Show is November 18, and we’ll be here to report.

 
 
 
 
 

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