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Lincoln Aviator Diesel Reportedly Axed, Wouldn’t Have Made Any Sense

There was a time when Volkswagen tried to make diesel a thing in the United States of America, a popular thing beyond the usual suspects. But other than big trucks and semis, this kind of dinosaur juice doesn’t make too much sense in this part of the world. Following the Dieselgate scandal, diesel-powered vehicles really took a nosedive in the U.S.
2022 Lincoln Aviator with Jet Package 16 photos
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Fiat Chrysler has also used illegal software in EcoDiesel V6-powered Rams and Jeeps, resulting in approximately $300 million worth of penalties. Looking even closer into diesel’s footprint stateside, you will notice that many automakers have or are slowly but steadily abandoning diesel mills.

Ford comes to mind with the Power Stroke V6 of the F-150 pickup truck. Introduced for the 2018 model year to fend off the Ram 1500 with the aforementioned EcoDiesel V6, this fellow had to be discontinued over dwindling sales. The introduction of the PowerBoost V6 hybrid powertrain didn’t help either, and that was that. Spy photographers captured a diesel-engined Lincoln Aviator back in March 2019, but as you’ve probably guessed already, Ford’s bean counters have most likely axed that project.

Ford Authority speculates that Lincoln may have understood that it’s not exactly necessary, more so if you remember that Lincoln’s mid-size utility vehicle is available with plug-in assistance. They call this powertrain the Grand Touring, and it’s properly badass on paper: 494 horsepower, 630 pound-feet (854 Nm) of torque, and 23 miles per gallon (10.2 l/100 km).

Even the EcoBoost V6 is alright for this application: 400 horsepower, 415 pound-feet (563 Nm) of torque, and in the ballpark of 20 miles per gallon (11.7 l/100 km) with all-wheel drive on the EPA’s combined test cycle.

The Ford Transit with the 2.0-liter EcoBlue turbo diesel is understood to have been canceled as well. Given that Ford already sells a zero-emission Transit for $46,295 excluding destination charge and the federal tax credit, it’s very clear that canning the four-pot diesel was the right thing to do.

 
 
 
 
 

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