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Lidless Suzuki Hayabusa Rider Races 1030 WHP Toyota Supra, Hard to Tell Who Won

Today we are observing a highly-tuned Toyota Supra out in the wild, driving down the highway in Greece, as it takes on its "natural" enemy: the Suzuki Hayabusa. Over the years we've grown accustomed to seeing Supras like this one doing highway pulls, against other fast cars, but also against fast motorcycles.
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And you never really know how these races will conclude when you start watching. Sometimes the Supra wins, sometimes to motorcycle wins. Multiple factors will influence the outcome, but either way, it's always interesting to watch. Because most normal, road-going vehicles, could never really stand a chance against such a fast bike.

We got in touch with the owner of the Supra, Kostas Xatzikouvas, and asked him about the mods on the car. And let me tell you, the list is not small by any means. This is a 1995 RHD Toyota Supra, which started as an original twin-turbo version, but has since gone through a lot of changes.

The twin-turbo setup has been replaced with a much larger, single-turbo, which just happens to be a 2nd generation, Precision 8685, the kind of turbo you'd expect to pay around $4,000 for. The engine is running on a Syvecs S6+ ECU and it's getting its fuel via ID1700x injectors and an Aeromotive mechanical fuel pump.



The stock crankshaft was polished, and there are now diamond billet pistons and R&R Aluminum rods inside of the engine, alongside other race-ready parts. Of course, a Dry Sump kit from Titan Motorsport was also fitted to the vehicle, as nothing was left to chance with such a high horsepower build.

The car's sitting on a Kaaz rear diff and Ksport drag-spec coil-overs. While the front wheels are 18" with a big brake kit, on the back Kostas has gone for a set of billet 15" wheels with Wilwood drag-spec brakes. The transmission is an ATI TH400 which should be capable to take up to 2,000 horsepower, which is a good thing if you look at the dyno sheet of this Supra.

On pump gas, this 2JZ-GTE unit will make 1,030 whp! On race fuel figures went up to 1,360 whp, and when using the nitrous shot the maximum output went up to 1,520 whp. It's no wonder this thing also comes with a 2-parachute setup, because the best result it managed to achieve was an 8.23-second pass down the quarter-mile (402 m), with an exit speed of 177 mph (286 km/h). On the other side, the Busa reportedly comes with a fully built engine and 207 whp.



But let's dive into the actual Supra vs Hayabusa race. What struck me from the very first moment was that the rider was not wearing a helmet. Why anyone would engage in a high-speed race, on a motorcycle, and not have his helmet is beyond me. I had a crash at the racetrack last year, and even with my helmet on I still managed to lose two of my teeth.

About five minutes into the video, they start lining up, and it seems like this is going to be a rolling race. They seem to start at around 60 mph (96 km/h), and as Kostas nods his head, they both engage in a wide-open throttle battle. The Hayabusa instantly jumps ahead, but the result is inconclusive, as there is traffic ahead preventing them from really going all out.

Two more minutes in, they go at it again. The Hayabusa once again takes the lead, but only for a brief moment, as the second the boost kicks in with the Supra, the bike is left behind. We get to see the replay from the outside as well, and it does seem like this was a pretty neck-and-neck race, which kind of leaves us hanging in mid-air.

It would be interesting and safer to see these two guys duke it out in a controlled environment, at the drag strip, or on a closed section of road, and with some official timing at hand. In the meantime, remember to always wear your helmet when you're out riding, it might save your life!



 
 
 
 
 

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