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Lamborghini Urus Demonstrates Just How Far Mansory’s Madness Can Go

Just how blue can a car’s interior possibly get? One thing’s for sure, subtlety isn’t exactly ranked very high up Mansory’s list of priorities.
Venatus 13 photos
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Over the years, the aftermarket manufacturer stacked up some truly outrageous, yet fascinating custom builds. Their portfolio is virtually endless, but some of their projects include the spectacular Aston Martin DB11 Cyrus and a Bentley Continental GT Cabriolet that looks fit for The Matrix, as well as a carbon fiber animal based on the Aventador 750-4 Superveloce, to name a few.

The company was founded by Kourosh Mansory in Munich, Germany as early as 1989, and developed a unique style that continues to set them apart from other firms today. Many tuners are happy to go pretty damn far when it comes to visual customization, but few will dare chop up a vehicle as much as Mansory does.

However, their odd design language and heavily modified machines aren’t for everyone, having earned mixed reviews from petrolheads and a hell of a lot of public attention. To refresh your memory on just how relentless Mansory’s creations tend to get, we’ll be taking a look at what they did to this poor Lamborghini Urus.

Venatus
When it debuted back in 2017, Lambo’s Urus was the world’s fastest production SUV to have ever touched the tarmac. As to the 2020 model, it is powered by the same venomous 4.0-liter bi-turbo V8 engine found in the Porsche Cayenne and Audi’s RS6. The manufacturer refined this powerplant for the Urus, making it capable of delivering up to 641 hp at 6,000 rpm and 627 pound-feet (850 Nm) of torque output at 2,250 rpm.

An eight-speed automatic gearbox transmits power to each and every one of its 21-inch alloy wheels. In terms of chassis, the Urus is equipped with carbon-ceramic brakes and an adaptive air suspension setup. Its generous amount of high-performance gear allows the Rambo Lambo to accelerate 0-62 mph (0-100 kph) in as little as 3.6 seconds.

Mansory’s makeover, dubbed Venatus EVO, features a design that might remind you of the firm’s Ford GT-based Le Mansory, and it has to be the bluest Urus you’ve ever come across. On the exterior, you will notice a few widebody elements, such as larger fender flairs, as well as a plethora of carbon fiber components.

Venatus
These include Venatus’ side skirts, its custom spoiler and hood, along with the side mirror housings, air intakes and rear bumper. Additionally, this bad boy is now supported by a set of colossal 24-inch seven-spoke wheels.

Its ridiculously blue cabin is wrapped up in leather and Alcantara materials, lined with neon green accents. Obviously, there must be a healthy dose of carbon fiber here to match the bodywork, so Mansory added countless interior trimmings that carry on that lightweight goodness.

No customization is complete without a considerable boost to the output numbers and this company knows it just as well. As such, they provided Venatus with a high-performance catalytic converter and an upgraded engine management system that will have the standard Urus’ figures dialed to an astounding 838 hp and as much as 738 pound-feet (1,000 Nm) of torque.

Personally, I may not be too fond of that absurd interior, but I’ll have to admit that this thing’s bodywork is actually fairly neat. Oh, and when it comes to performance, all those extra ponies guarantee that Mansory’s monstrosity would absolutely butcher Lambo’s stock whip!

 

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