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Kia e-Niro Electric Range Downgraded Over “Disproportionate” WLTP Testing

Announced with great pomp and circumstance, the e-Niro should deliver 301 miles from the 64-kWh battery pack. But an independent firm found out that the organization failed to apply the correct practice during the WLTP (Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicle Test Procedure).
Kia e-Niro with original range estimate (now 282 miles) 19 photos
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According to Autocar, the e-Niro with the optional battery “now has an official range of 282 miles rather than 301 miles” while the e-Niro with the standard battery (39.2 kWh) “is rated at 179 miles rather than 193 miles.” The South Korean automaker is contacting customers who have bought the car to explain the changes, although there’s no mention of compensation in this regard.

Kia explains that “the independent organization overseeing the test process accidentally provided an incorrect testing methodology and then approved the results it generated.” The e-Niro was tested for a longer time than mandated by the WLTP on the urban cycle, which favors electric vehicles. Alas, the lower overall speed and reduced energy requirement compromised the electric range, resulting in an over-estimation.

The British publication reports Kia discovered the problem on its own “during ongoing homologation work for another electric vehicle,” which we guess it’s the Soul EV presented at the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show. The square-shaped crossover is also available with the 64-kWh battery pack, and the first examples of the breed will arrive in Europe in the earliest part of 2019.

Regardless of the mess-up, Autocar highlights that the e-Niro “achieved the second equal highest range of any electric car to date” during independent range testing on public roads, matching the 253 miles recorded by the Jaguar I-Pace. The Hyundai Kona Electric, on the other hand, is king of the hill thanks to a real-world range of 259 miles.

Pricing for the e-Niro hasn’t been announced, but being the same size as the Kona Electric, we’re guessing that Kia doesn’t plan to make a discordant note. Over in Germany, the Hyundai with the standard battery starts at 34,600 euros while the 64-kWh option levels up to 39,000 euros.

 
 
 
 
 

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