autoevolution

Kawasaki KZ1000 Giappone Is Both Custom and Restomod, Packs Vintage Flair Galore

In case you’re wondering what that name might stand for, it’s how you say “Japan” in Italian.
Kawasaki KZ1000 Giappone 12 photos
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Since he’d established the workshop that bears his surname back in 2012, Stefano Venier has been on a constant march towards bigger and better things. Brooklyn-based Venier Customs is now an extremely prominent player on the East Coast’s bike-modding scene, and the autoevolution pages are no strangers to the astonishing motorcycles built by Stefano and his crew.

Once upon a time, the restyled beauty found in these photos (aka Giappone) had been a bone-stock Kawasaki KZ1000 LTD from 1984. Aiming to give the donor a bespoke personality while staying true to its original spirit, Venier employed the assistance of a metalwork specialist named Lou Neziri, who sculpted seamless knee indentations on both sides of the factory gas tank.

Up front is where you’ll spot the repurposed bikini fairing of a first-gen Moto Guzzi Le Mans, accompanied by a Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade’s inverted forks, triple clamps, and brakes. At the rear end, suspension duties are taken good care of thanks to aftermarket shock absorbers, and proportions are tightened by a trimmed subframe.

Atop this item, we find a new seat upholstered in brown leather and a minute tail section sporting LED lighting at its southernmost tip. There’s a tiny lithium battery hiding beneath the saddle, along with custom wiring and Motogadget’s widely-acclaimed m-Unit control module. Up in the cockpit area, Giappone carries a GPS speedometer, clip-on handlebars, and classy rubber grips, as well as bar-end turn signals and mirrors.

Turning their attention to the final touches, Venier’s craftsmen proceeded to install a modified four-into-one Kerker exhaust, which is sure to provide an enthralling soundtrack at any point on the rpm range. In addition, premium air filters can be found on the other end of the combustion cycle, so the Kawi’s inline-four engine is able to breathe a lot more freely than it did before.

 
 
 
 
 

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