autoevolution

Japanese Automakers Will Jointly Develop a Next-Gen Basis for Connected Services

The future of the automotive industry holds a plethora of mysterious candidates to emerge as mobility champions. Naturally, automakers are trying to leave no stone unturned in the bid to secure a top position in the new era. And that includes everything, from new energy powertrains to unique styling choices or the next-generation communication devices.
Suzuki, Subaru, Daihatsu, Mazda and Toyota agreement on next-gen vehicle communications 4 photos
Suzuki, Subaru, Daihatsu, Mazda and Toyota agreement on next-gen vehicle communicationsSuzuki, Subaru, Daihatsu, Mazda and Toyota agreement on next-gen vehicle communicationsSuzuki, Subaru, Daihatsu, Mazda and Toyota agreement on next-gen vehicle communications
Speaking of the latter, the Japanese carmakers seem ready to jointly develop their next-generation vehicle devices on the basis of new technical specifications for communication duties. More precisely, Suzuki, Subaru, Daihatsu, Mazda, and Toyota have reached a collaborative agreement that will see the companies “promote the common use of communications systems.”

They will co-develop the necessary technical specifications for the upcoming next-generation communication devices as they ultimately strive to use “connected services to link automobiles and society with the aim of creating new appeal, value and services.” More importantly, these technologies will also come with a standardized form that enables “safer and more convenient connected services.”

That has to do with the way these companies interpret the well-known CASE (connected, autonomous/automated, shared, and electric) field, aiming to pick up the pace when it comes to big data, cloud services, IoT (Internet of Things), or AI (Artificial Intelligence).

By establishing a cooperative domain, Japanese automakers strive to make it easier to develop the basic functions (such as the creation of vehicle communications devices) while their in-house efforts will have an easier time focusing on the R&D of specific applications and services.

Suzuki, Subaru, Daihatsu, and Mazda said that “at this time (…) while incorporating their own technologies into the base vehicle communications technologies developed by Toyota, will together build systems for next-generation connected cars with common connection specifications from vehicles to networks and the vehicle communications device center.”

In the end, for end-user clients this could translate into things such as clearer calls or increased connection speeds. For automakers, it will lower development burdens and enable less time spent on creating upgrades with newer functions, for example.

press release
 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories