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Is the Harley-Davidson Hi Lows Still Spinning That Huge on 330 Rear Wheel Somewhere?

We’ve been covering custom motorcycles, more specifically Harley-Davidsons, for a long time, and we’ve learned that one of the first things shops like to do to the donor bikes is replace the wheels.
Harley-Davidson Hi Lows 31 photos
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Whereas at the front, generally speaking, the dimensions of the custom wheels are not something to write home about, not the same can be said for the rear. There, almost all stock wheels are replaced with wider ones, as if Harley-Davidson made some design mistake that it’s not willing to repair.

Most of the time, we see Harley-Davidsons get their stock, standard width tires swapped for 280 mm, and in rarer cases 300 mm wide ones. The rarest of the bunch are the customs wearing 330 mm-wide tires over the custom wheel.

Most recently, we came across such a thing with the VROD 330 put together in the shops of a Spanish garage called Lord Drake Customs. Just to give you an idea of how insane that is, consider the fact that for use in Spain, such a wheel required special homologation.

We’re not entirely sure if that’s the case when it comes to Japan, where Bad Land works its magic, but here’s another 330 crossing our screens, a Springer Softail put together in stock form by the Americans in 2001.

The build, now called Hi Lows, is an older project of Bad Land, having first been shown at the beginning of the last decade. We found it worthy of renewed attention exactly because of that massive rear wheel, and their scarcity on the market.

The wheels chosen for the project are of Rick’s Motorcycle make and have a diameter of 18 inches up front and 17 inches at the rear. The rubber that wraps around them wears the Avon logo.

Aside from fitting the Hi Lows with massive wheels, Bad Land made in house, specifically for this build, things like the fenders, fuel tank, handlebar, and exhaust system.

We’re not told how much the bike cost to put together, and given how quite some time passed since it was completed, its whereabouts are unknown. We can only hope though that the huge wheel still spins out there somewhere.

 
 
 
 
 

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