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Insane $60 Million Muscle Car Collection Features Original Promotional General Lee Charger

Depending on how you got rich, you could easily get wasteful. And being wasteful sometimes rubs people the wrong way. On the contrary, if you get rich through hard work and persistence, you’ll guard your wealth with your life (for the next generation). That’s what John Marconi and his family did. They own an insane $60 million muscle and supercar collection dedicated to supporting children at risk – the Marconi Automotive Museum.
Marconi Automotive Museum Car collection 19 photos
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The folks at AutotopiaLA got the chance to do a walkthrough of this insane $60 million museum and kid’s foundation that features some of the most iconic muscle and supercars in the world.

What I find so fascinating about the Marconis is they’re very philanthropic. As a matter of fact, everything we are about to show you, they donated all their vehicles to their museum. The museum is all about supporting at-risk kids,” Sean of AutotopiaLA said, introducing the Marconi Automotive Museum and Foundation for Kids.

John Marconi isn’t just another philanthropist with a fat pocket. He’s an avid car collector and an automotive geek. Apart from having an extensive racing history, he occasionally gets his hands dirty building muscle cars.

Most people wouldn’t call it a muscle car, but John Marconi considers his 50s Ford Thunderbird a muscle car partly because it runs on a V8 and dons some sporty characteristics, including its spoke wheels and turquoise and white top shade.

Another iconic muscle car in his museum is a 1968 Ford Mustang with a captivating story. It was donated by an former Marine, turned successful hotelier who’d put down $135,000 to restore the classic. Marconi Museum got the classic on condition it remains as is.

The next classic muscle car on the lineup was a 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302. His family has owned this car for about 35 years. It started as a 302 but later got replaced with a 351 Cleveland engine.

This Mustang is the gazelle of handling of that period car 68 69. It just is. I don’t know why. It’s the way the geometry is set up, all that stuff. So when I plopped this big motor in, it just screwed up everything,” Marconi confessed about his 69 Boss.

A fantastic unit in the Marconi museum is a survivor Ford Mustang 428 Cobra Jet. Next to it is a 1971 Ford Mustang Ram Air Mach 1. John Marconi has no apologies and thinks it’s the ugliest Mustang ever produced.

He also has a pair of matching Cudas. Marconi reveals the lime green one belongs to his wife, Michelle. The other one in red is his favorite, a 340 Barracuda.

The Marconi Automotive Museum and Foundation for Kids also has a couple of other muscle cars, including a classic non-stock GT350, a Knight Rider kit car, and a real deal General Lee Dodge Charger promotional tour car.

Sean and Marconi later take out his favorite 340 Cuda for a spin, he promises to reveal more Marconi cars in the next episode. We recommend catching some of that classic muscle car action in the video below.

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