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Hyundai Kona Electric Still Catching Fire After Worldwide Recall

Late last year, South Korean automaker Hyundai got in trouble over a fiery issue. More to the point, the all-electric version of the Kona has a habit of catching fire. Many, many crossovers were recalled worldwide, and the culprit for this problem is believed to be the battery separator.
Hyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South Korea 11 photos
Hyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South KoreaHyundai Kona Electric that caught fire while charging in South Korea
Believe it or not, the recalled vehicles with all-new batteries are under investigation once again. The latest vehicle fire happened on Saturday, according to the Korea Herald, referring to a crossover that went ablaze while it was charging at a public station in the city of Daegu.

This time around, the Korea Transportation Safety Authority is investigating the problem as opposed to the National Forensic Service that investigates car accidents at large. According to the cited publication, the KTSA will also look into the replacement battery for any potential defects.

In the worst-case scenario for Hyundai, the South Korean automaker will have to recall approximately 77,000 units worldwide for a second time. But on this occasion, the governmental watchdogs are likely to demand Hyundai to use a better design for the battery separator or whatever may be at fault.

Following the publishing of this report, the stock price took a small dive over the potential costs that would result from such a massive operation. Calling back over a defective windshield wiper or a software-related problem is one thing, but lithium-ion batteries are obviously more expensive.

The affected population was built from September 2017 to March 2020 with 39.2 and 64-kWh batteries. Updated stylistically for the 2021 model year, the Kona Electric is exclusively offered with the largest pack in the United States of America, where the MSRP is listed at $37,390 before any savings.

With an EPA-estimated range of 258 miles (415 kilometers) and 201 horsepower from a front-mounted electric motor, the subcompact crossover is a very interesting alternative to the likes of the Chevrolet Bolt EV hatchback. For reference, the Golden Bowtie is charging $36,500 before destination charge, and GM isn’t eligible for the $7,500 federal tax credit.

 
 
 
 
 

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