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Honda Accord 2.0T Drag Races Hyundai Elantra N DCT, Obvious Result Ensues

Although sedans aren’t particularly desirable in this utility vehicle-driven era, the Accord isn’t breaking a sweat. Honda delivered no fewer than 202,676 units last year in the United States of America, which is pretty darn good in these tremendously challenging times for the automotive industry.
Honda Accord 2.0T Drag Races Hyundai Elantra N DCT 6 photos
Honda Accord 2.0T Drag Races Hyundai Elantra N DCTHonda Accord 2.0T Drag Races Hyundai Elantra N DCTHonda Accord 2.0T Drag Races Hyundai Elantra N DCTHonda Accord 2.0T Drag Races Hyundai Elantra N DCTHonda Accord 2.0T Drag Races Hyundai Elantra N DCT
The biggest rival of the Camry is currently listed from $26,120 excluding destination charge, roughly four grand more than the Civic Sedan. The LX base trim level is very well appointed right off the bat, although some prospective customers aren’t particularly fond of the 1.5-liter turbo and continuously variable transmission in a mid-size car. The next grade up is much more like it, thanks to an optional 2.0-liter turbo and nine-speed box.

Priced at $28,580 sans taxes, the Sport can be upgraded to the previously mentioned engine-transmission combo for $4,530. The resulting $33,660 sticker price gets you 252 horsepower at 6,500 revolutions per minute as well as 273 pound-feet (370 Nm) of torque between 1,500 and 4,000 rpm.

Tipping the scales at 3,356 pounds, which is 1,522 kilograms if you prefer the metric system, the Accord Sport with the better engine and torque-converter automatic transmission is pretty close to what Hyundai charges for the much-praised Elantra N. Priced at $32,150 for the sole trim level available right now, the South Korean compact sedan has one single option to speak of in the guise of a wet-clutch transmission, an eight-speed DCT.

The $1,500 gearbox unlocks the full potential of the 2.0-liter turbo hiding under the hood in the so-called N Grin Shift, a driving mode that increases boost pressure to unlock 286 horsepower instead of the standard 276 horsepower. 289 pound-feet (392 Nm) of torque at 2,100 revolutions per minute also need to be mentioned, along with a curb weight of 3,186 pounds (1,445 kilograms) for the manual and 3,296 lbs (1,495 kgs) with the DCT.

From a dig, the Accord 2.0T launches better than the Elantra N should’ve had this one in the bag. On the other hand, the lower weight and extra torque speak for themselves over the quarter mile. The Hyundai also proves its mettle from a roll, but still, the plucky Honda deserves a standing ovation.



 
 
 
 
 

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