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Hi-Tech Nuclear Sub Runs Aground

The Royal Navy is hard at work renewing its submarines fleet, with sea trials of new generation subs, thought to be some of the most advanced in the world, being currently conducted in the waters around the islands.

Unfortunately for the fame of the new generation of super-subs, one of them, the HMS Astute, a ship which was commissioned this August, encountered a big of a snag this week. Or, should we say, encountered some very stubborn rocks.

According to MSNBC, the HMS Astute was in the middle of a routine exchange of crew members in the vicinity of the Isle of Skye, in Scotland, when for unknown reasons got stuck on some rocks. The captain of the boat, Cmdr. Andy Coles, who could have forced the sub off the rocks, decided not to and called for help.

"At some point she touched the rudder on the bottom and they weren't able to get her off immediately," a Navy spokesman told The Telegraph. "There are no nuclear issues, no environmental impact, no injuries to people - potential damage to the rudder, that's about it."

At the time of the incident, the submarine was not carrying any nuclear weapons, the Royal Navy says.
The crew of the submarine, together with the ship called to the rescue, had to wait for high tide before pulling the sub free, into deeper waters.

The Royal Navy will now look for any damages sustained by the $1.88 billion submarine, considered by many one of the most advanced ever made.

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About the author: Daniel Patrascu
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Daniel loves writing (or so he claims), and he uses this skill to offer readers a "behind the scenes" look at the automotive industry. He also enjoys talking about space exploration and robots, because in his view the only way forward for humanity is away from this planet, in metal bodies.
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