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Here’s Your Chance to Own a Ferrari Enzo... Sort Of

1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo 12 photos
1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo
We’re pretty sure there aren’t many out there that would ever take this kit car for anything else than what it is, an ugly replica of a masterpiece. For some reason, such contraptions are quite popular in the world of online automotive sales. This 1986 Pontiac Fiero modified to look like a Ferrari Enzo is currently available for $5,500 on Craigslist.

When engineers in Maranello were busy handling Formula One technology, the world knew little to zero of what was about to come out of the Italian factory. They produced 400 of these beauties, and Ken Okuyama’s talent can be observed all over the place. The design may belong to Pininfarina, but when it comes to performance, there’s a whole new conversation.

The Enzo’s F140 B V12 engine was the first of a new generation for Ferrari. Yes, we all know they used the same design that was found in Maserati’s Quattroporte. Even so, it’s a work of art that produces an impressive 641 horsepower output. Put it this way, this beast can accelerate to 60 mph (97 km/h) in 3.14 seconds and can reach 100 mph (160 km/h) in 6.6 seconds.

All these considered; you now know why we just can’t agree with such contraptions. Its owner claims the gull wing doors work, and so does the entire vehicle, but it “will need a little work”. Apparently, the car has been stored for eight years, which also means it needs some further trips to the garage.

To be honest, we’d rather drive a wrecked 1986 Pontiac Fiero than take this kit car to the road anytime. But if you want to pull out an expensive prank on a friend you should probably hurry.

 
 
 
 
 

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