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Here’s How Many Unfinished GM Vehicles Are Currently Parked and Waiting for Chips

General Motors has been having a hard time dealing with the disruptions caused by the global chip shortage, and more recently, the company turned to a new series of adjustments in an attempt to reduce the impact on its daily operations.
General Motors struggling to deal with chip inventory issues 6 photos
GM's Flint assembly plantGM's Flint assembly plantGM's Flint assembly plantGM's Flint assembly plantGM's Flint assembly plant
In a regulatory filing, General Motors confirms that its wholesale vehicle volumes “were impacted by the timing of certain semiconductor shipments and other supply chain disruptions.” The company admits this was the case during the second quarter of the year, and as a result, it has no more, no less than 95,000 vehicles parked in storage and waiting for chips.

Like other carmakers out there, General Motors built certain vehicles without a series of systems, all in an attempt to keep the production going and avoid shutting down plants.

The plan was as simple as it could be. The production lines continued to work, sometimes at a slower speed, with vehicles rolling off the assembly lines without certain non-critical systems. General Motors then moved the cars to storage, hoping to get the necessary chips, install the missing systems, and then ship them to dealers as fast as possible.

Right now, there are close to 100,000 GM vehicles waiting for the chips, and the company says that most of them were built last month.

However, the automaker is optimistic it would be able to install the missing systems in a timely manner, but this isn’t necessarily good news for customers in the States. This is because the timely manner bit actually represents the end of 2022, so General Motors basically wants to finish all these 95,000 vehicles and send them to customers by December 31.

In other words, if one of the vehicles that you ordered is part of this lot waiting for chips, you might have to wait until the end of the year to be able to drive it, obviously, as long as General Motors manages to deal with the supply chain disruptions.

 
 
 
 
 

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