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Here’s a Bugatti Divo Gently and Expensively Bumping Into Parked Mercedes-Benz

Slightly bumping into a parked car as you maneuver in or out of a tight parking spot is not the most terrible thing to happen to a driver in traffic. But it can be very expensive, if said driver is sitting in a Bugatti.
1-of-40 Bugatti Divo backs into parked Mercedes-Benz in very expensive parking fail 56 photos
1-of-40 Bugatti Divo backs into parked Mercedes-Benz in very expensive parking fail1-of-40 Bugatti Divo backs into parked Mercedes-Benz in very expensive parking fail1-of-40 Bugatti Divo backs into parked Mercedes-Benz in very expensive parking fail
Normally, one such incident wouldn’t even make headlines. After all, what’s so special about a car gently “kissing” the car parked behind it? It’s a daily occurrence in big and crowded cities, and it’s not even expensive; most of the time, you have to look really hard or know what to look for in order to see any damage.

Things change if one of the cars involved is a Bugatti Divo. It happened recently outside of the Westin Paris – Vendôme hotel in the French capital, and was filmed by supercar spotter Victor Jennes (@ledriviste on Instagram) and reposted by @supercarfails. Someone, presumably the owner of the Divo, tried to back it so as to clear the exit out of the spot, and accidentally “kissed” a Mercedes-Benz CLS.

The actual bump wasn’t caught on camera, but everything else about it was, down to the reaction of two hotel employees, who came out to assist whoever was at the wheel of the Divo. One inspected the damage on the two vehicles, and the other made sure the Divo wouldn’t also bump the Porsche parked in front of it.

Again, such an incident wouldn’t even register with either car enthusiasts or the media. But this Divo is one of 40 units made (the last production Divo was completed in July this year), and it comes with a price tag of at least $5.4 million dollars. It’s a work of art and a technological wonder all in one, in the shape of a hypercar, so the smallest and least noticeable damage done to the carbon fiber body or the highly engineered parts will automatically translate in expensive repairs.

This is the sound of money being thrown down the drain in a moment of inattention.



 
 
 
 
 

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