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Here's a 1966 Mercury Comet Race Car That Really Doesn't Want to Abandon the Fight

A 1966 Mercury Comet that served as a race car for a big part of its life is trying to convince a brave restorer to take it home and give it a second chance.
1966 Mercury Comet race car 21 photos
Photo: Bogdan Popa/autoevolution/eBay seller dd_auto_salvage
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The vehicle, posted on eBay by seller dd_auto_salvage, doesn't exhibit its best shape, but it looks doable, especially in terms of metal. I would've expected the undersides to be rough, but they look better than I anticipated, especially considering it's a car that hasn't moved in a long time.

The seller says they purchased this Comet as part of a collection of 30 cars, so the information they have is fairly limited. That's alright, though, as a 1966 Comet race race is still intriguing enough to catch our attention. It looks great, especially given its age, though bringing it back on the road isn't for the faint of heart.

There are a lot of parts missing, and a quick look at the photos will provide you with additional details on this front. It's probably easier to retain the racing appetite and keep this car on the track, as you'll have fewer parts to find, purchase, and install.

The engine under the hood is a 351 Clevelandd coming from Ford, so it no longer flexes the original mill. That's quite a shame, though, as the 1966 Comet came with several potential units, including new options like the 390. It was offered in both two- and four-barrel configurations (with 265 and 335 horsepower, respectively), with the latter offered standard on the Cyclone GT.

The hefty engine allowed the GT to become the pace car for the 1966 Indianapolis 500, so the Comet was more or less born with a strong desire to hit the track.

The 351 Cleveland is presumably still running, but you'll have to decrypt everything that happens under the hood yourselves. You can find the car in Logan, Utah.

The bidding starts at $1, though I don't expect the car to receive too many offers. A race car isn't everybody's cup of tea, though a Mercury Comet should receive more attention, especially from people interested in turning it into a daily driver. The missing parts could be a problem and eventually make many people walk away, but the WWW still has approximately nine days to save this car.

If you don't want to fight against other netizens and try to unlock the reserve, your best option is the Buy It Now button. You can trigger it by agreeing to pay $10,000, which is a lot for a car in this shape, especially considering all the problems I mentioned above. With a little luck, the reserve is much lower, and it wouldn't take long before it's unlocked.
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About the author: Bogdan Popa
Bogdan Popa profile photo

Bogdan keeps an eye on how technology is taking over the car world. His long-term goals are buying an 18-wheeler because he needs more space for his kid’s toys, and convincing Google and Apple that Android Auto and CarPlay deserve at least as much attention as their phones.
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