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Hennessey-tuned Porsche Taycan In the Works, It Is “A Little Faster and Cooler”

When you’re talking about Hennessey Performance Engineering, your first thought might be the VelociRaptor V8. Other possibilities include 6x6 conversions such as the Goliath, the Camaro ZL1 Exorcist, and 1,200-horsepower builds based on the Dodge Demon and Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk.
Hennessey-tuned Porsche Taycan 37 photos
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2020 presents a different challenge for the Texas-based tuning company, which has confirmed the development of a go-faster Porsche Taycan. Hennessey will take delivery of the development car soon after the first examples of the Taycan reach the U.S. next year with 800-volt battery technology.

“We’ve been planning to do something with electrified vehicles for a while now,” explained John Hennessey, founder and head honcho of HPE. “We felt that the new Porsche Taycan was the right platform from which to modify our first electric vehicle.” In the first instance, customers should expect simple mods such as the wheels, tires, interior upgrades, and exterior flourishes.

“We will see what might be possible in terms of adding more power,” concluded John, and that gets us to how capable the Turbo and Turbo S are in their bog-standard configurations. Modifying a fast car isn’t too hard when you’re dealing with internal combustion, but improving the design of an electric motor or changing it for another is another story altogether.

The biggest problem could be the software, as in how the changes brought by Hennessey relate to one another. There’s an important relation between the battery, electric motors, and control modules to consider, one that depends on thousands if not millions of lines of carefully crafted code.

This means that John has to dig deep into his pockets to hire a few talented programmers for this project, people who know what they’re doing in order to retain the reliability of the Porsche’s drivetrain and charging system. A bigger battery is out of the question, more so if you remember that 93.4 kilowatt-hours are sufficient for a vehicle of this size and weight.

As for pricing, the sky is the limit is you remember the Taycan Turbo starts at $150,900 while the Taycan Turbo S is $185,000 excluding destination charge. We’d bet a tenner the whole package from Hennessey Performance Engineering would bring the price beyond $200,000, a whole lot more than Tesla’s projected price for the Model S with Plaid Mode.



 
 
 
 
 

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